Etymology
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sling (n.3)
"act of throwing," 1520s, from sling (v.).
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jettison (v.)

1848, "to throw overboard," especially to save a ship in danger, from jettison (n.) "act of throwing overboard" to lighten a ship. This noun was an 18c. Marine Insurance writers' restoration of the earlier form and original sense of the 15c. word that had become jetsam, probably because jetsam had taken on a sense of "things cast overboard" and an unambiguous word was needed for "act of casting things overboard."

Middle English jetteson (n.) "act of throwing overboard" is from Anglo-French getteson, Old French getaison "act of throwing (goods overboard)," especially to lighten a ship in distress, from Late Latin iactationem (nominative iactatio) "a throwing, act of throwing," noun of action from past participle stem of iactare "to throw, toss about" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Jettisoned.

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quoits (n.)

"game played by throwing quoits," late 14c., coytes; see quoit.

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ballista (n.)
ancient war engine used for throwing missiles, late 14c., from Latin ballista, literally "a throwing machine," from Greek ballein "to throw" (from PIE root *gwele- "to throw, reach").
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toss (n.)
"an act of throwing," 1630s, from toss (v.). Meaning "a coin toss" is from 1798.
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hurl (n.)
late 14c., "rushing water," from hurl (v.). Mid-15c. as "strife, quarrel;" sense of "act of throwing violently" is from 1520s.
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jetsam (n.)
1560s, jottsome "act of throwing goods overboard to lighten a ship," alteration and contraction of Middle English jetteson, from Anglo-French getteson, Old French getaison "a throwing" (see jettison). Intermediate forms were jetson, jetsome; the form perhaps was deformed by influence of flotsam. From 1590s as "goods thrown overboard;" figurative use by 1861. For distinction of meaning, see flotsam.
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throw (n.)

"act of throwing," 1520s, from throw (v.). Wrestling sense is attested by 1819.

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atlatl (n.)
Native American throwing stick, 1871, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) atlatl "spear-thrower."
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high-roller (n.)
"extravagant spender," by 1873, American English, probably originally a reference to a gambler throwing dice.
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