Etymology
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thrive (v.)
c. 1200, from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse þrifask "to thrive," originally "grasp to oneself," probably reflexive of þrifa "to clutch, grasp, grip, take hold of" (compare Norwegian triva "to seize," Swedish trifvas, Danish trives "to thrive, flourish"), of unknown origin. Related: Thrived (or throve); thriving.
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throve 
sometime past tense of thrive (v.).
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thrift (n.)
c. 1300, "fact or condition of thriving," also "prosperity, savings," from Middle English thriven "to thrive" (see thrive), influenced by (or from) Old Norse þrift, variant of þrif "prosperity," from þrifask "to thrive." Sense of "habit of saving, economy" first recorded 1550s (thrifty in this sense is recorded from 1520s; also see spendthrift). Thrift shop attested by 1919.
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choreographer (n.)
1829, from choreography + -er (1). Choreographist (1857) did not thrive. In Greek, a person who trained a chorus was a khorodidaskelikos.
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antisepsis (n.)
"exclusion of micro-organisms which produce disease, etc., from places where they may thrive," 1875; see anti- "against" + sepsis "putrefaction."
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-trophy 
word-forming element meaning "food, nourishment," from Greek -trophia, from trophe "food, nourishment," related to trephein "make thrive, nourish, rear; to make solid, congeal, thicken."
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quacksalver (n.)

"one who boasts of skill in medicines, a medical charlatan," 1570s; see quack (n.1). The back-formed verb quacksalve (c. 1600) did not thrive.

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flourish (v.)
c. 1300, "to blossom, grow" (intransitive), from Old French floriss-, stem of florir "to blossom, flower, bloom; prosper, flourish," from Latin florere "to bloom, blossom, flower," figuratively "to flourish, be prosperous," from flos "a flower" (from PIE root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom"). Metaphoric sense of "thrive" is mid-14c. in English. Transitive meaning "brandish (a weapon), hold in the hand and wave about" is from late 14c. Related: Flourished; flourishing.
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phyllo- 

before vowels phyll-, word-forming element meaning "leaf," from Greek phyllon "a leaf" (from PIE *bhol-yo- "leaf," suffixed form of root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom").

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flower (v.)
c. 1200, "be vigorous, prosper, thrive," from flower (n.). Of a plant or bud, "to blossom," c. 1300. Meaning "adorn or cover with flowers" is from 1570s. Related: Flowered; flowering.
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