Etymology
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tangle (n.)

1610s, "a tangled condition, a snarl of threads," from tangle (v.).

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threadbare (adj.)

late 14c., from thread (n.) + bare. The notion is of "having the nap worn off," leaving bare the threads.

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fagoting (n.)

in embroidery, 1885, from faggot (n.1) "bundle." So called from the threads tied together in the middle.

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fimbria (n.)

"a fringing filament," from Late Latin fimbria (sing.), from Latin fimbriae (pl.), "fringe, border, threads." Related: Fimbriated (late 15c.); fimbrial.

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nerve (v.)

c. 1500, "to ornament with threads;" see nerve (n.). Meaning "to give strength or vigor" is from 1749. Related: Nerved; nerving.

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turnbuckle (n.)

also turn-buckle, 1703, "catch or fastening for windows and shutters," from turn (v.) + buckle (n.). Meaning "coupling with internal screw threads for connecting metal rods" is attested from 1877.

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weft (n.)

"threads which run across the web from side to side," Old English weft, wefta "weft," related to wefan "to weave," from Proto-Germanic *weftaz (see weave (v.)).

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ropy (adj.)

"forming or developing slimy, viscous threads; sticky and stringy," late 15c. (Caxton), from rope (n.) + -y (2). Hence a general term of disapprobation. Related: Ropily; ropiness.

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stamina (n.)

1670s, "rudiments or original elements of something," from Latin stamina "threads," plural of stamen (genitive staminis) "thread, warp" (see stamen). Sense of "power to resist or recover, strength, endurance" first recorded 1726 (originally plural), from earlier meaning "congenital vital capacities of a person or animal;" also in part from use of the Latin word in reference to the threads spun by the Fates (such as queri nimio de stamine "too long a thread of life"), and partly from a figurative use of Latin stamen "the warp (of cloth)" on the notion of the warp as the "foundation" of a fabric. Related: Staminal.

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shirr (v.)

"to gather (cloth) by means of parallel threads," 1860 (implied in shirring), a back-formation from shirred (1847), related to shirr (n.) "elastic webbing" (1858); the whole group is of unknown origin.

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