Etymology
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No results were found for thirdness. Showing results for thickness.
thickness (n.)
Old English þicness "density, viscosity, hardness; depth; anything thick or heavy; darkness; thicket;" see thick + -ness.
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singlet (n.)
"unlined woolen garment," c. 1746, from single (adj.) in clothing sense of "unlined, of one thickness" (late 14c.) + -et, apparently in imitation of doublet.
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spissitude (n.)
"density, thickness, compactness," mid-15c., from Latin spissitudo "thickness, density," from spissus "thick, dense, compact, close" (source of Italian spesso, Spanish espeso, Old French espes, French épais). Related: Spissated.
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greatness (n.)
late Old English gretnys "thickness, coarseness, stoutness;" see great + -ness. Meaning "eminence" is early 14c.
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butt-end (n.)
"thick end," 1580s," from butt (n.1) + end (n.). Meaning "the mere end," without regard to thickness, is from 1590s.
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sadness (n.)

early 14c., sadnesse, "seriousness," from sad + -ness. Meaning "sorrowfulness, dejection of mind" is by c. 1500, perhaps c. 1400, but throughout Middle English the word usually referred to "solidness, firmness, thickness, toughness; permanence, continuance; maturity; sanity."

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density (n.)

c. 1600, "quality of being very close or compact," from French densité (16c.), from Old French dempsité (13c.), from Latin densitas "thickness," from densus "thick, dense" (see dense). In physics, "the mass of matter per unit of bulk," 1660s.

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layer (n.)
late 14c., "one who or that lays" (especially stones, "a mason"), agent noun from lay (v.). Passive sense of "a thickness of some material laid over a surface" is first recorded 1610s, but because the earliest English use was in cookery this is perhaps from French liue "binding," used of a thickened sauce. Of hens from 1707. Layer cake attested from 1875.
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M 

13th letter of the English alphabet, from Greek mu, from Semitic mem. It represents a very stable and unchanging sound in Indo-European, described by Johnson as "a kind of humming inward." The Roman symbol for 1,000; sometimes used in this sense in English 15c.-16c.; but in late 20c. newspaper headlines it stands for million. As a thickness of type, from 1680s (commonly spelled out, em).

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crass (adj.)

1540s, "thick, coarse, gross, not thin or fine," from French crasse (16c.), from Latin crassus "solid, thick, fat; dense," which is of unknown origin.

The literal sense always has been rare in English. The meaning in reference to personal qualities, etc., "grossly stupid, obtuse" is recorded from 1650s, from French. Middle English had cras (adj.) "slow, sluggish, tardy" (mid-15c.), also crassitude "thickness." Related: Crassly; crassness.

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