Etymology
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producer (n.)

1510s, "one who or that which produces;" agent noun from produce (v.). Of entertainments, from 1891; in political economy, "one who causes any article to have an exchangeable value" (opposed to consumer), by 1714 (John Locke).

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theatrical (adj.)
1550s, "pertaining to the theater;" see theater + -ical. Sense of "stagy, histrionic" is attested from 1709. Related: Theatrically; theatricality.
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Ziegfeld 
in reference to showgirls or stage revues, 1913, from Florenz Ziegfeld (1869-1932), U.S. theatrical producer, who staged annual "follies" from 1907-1931.
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film-maker (n.)
also filmmaker, 1859 as a solution used in developing photographs, later "a producer of film for cameras" (by 1889), from film (n.) + maker. As "producer of a cinematographic work, movie-maker," from 1905.
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first-hand (adj.)
also firsthand, "direct from the source or origin," 1690s, from the image of the "first hand" as the producer or maker of something.
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sing-along 
1959, noun and adjective, from verbal phrase; see sing (v.) + along (adv.). Originally associated with U.S. music producer Mitch Miller (1911-2010).
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Tony 
1947, awards given by American Theatre Wing (New York), from nickname of U.S. actress, manager, and producer Antoinette Perry (1888-1946).
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Disney 

surname attested from mid-12c. (William de Ysini), from Isigny in the Calvados region of Normandy. Disneyesque, in reference to the cartooning style of U.S. animator and producer Walt Disney (1901-1966), is attested by 1939.

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Disneyland (n.)

in figurative sense of "land of make-believe" first recorded 1956, from U.S. entertainment park (opened in 1955) created by animator and producer Walter E. Disney (1901-1966).

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showboat (n.)

also show-boat, 1838, "river steamer on which theatrical performances are given," from show (n.) + boat (n.). The verb meaning "to show off" is attested from 1951; the notion is of performing in the overly theatrical style of showboat players.

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