Etymology
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theatrical (adj.)
1550s, "pertaining to the theater;" see theater + -ical. Sense of "stagy, histrionic" is attested from 1709. Related: Theatrically; theatricality.
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poster (n.)

"bill, placard, thing posted," 1838, from post (v.1). Poster boy/girl/child "someone given prominence in certain causes" is attested by 1990, in reference to fund-raising drives for charities associated with disability, featuring child sufferers, a feature since 1930s.

Earlier it meant "one who travels post" (c. 1600); "a post-horse" (1797). Sense of "one who posts bills" is by 1864.

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four-poster (n.)
bedstead with high corner posts, 1836, from four + post (n.).
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fill (v.)

Old English fyllan "to fill, make full, fill up, replenish, satisfy; complete, fulfill," from Proto-Germanic *fulljanan "to fill" (source also of Old Saxon fulljan, Old Norse fylla, Old Frisian fella, Dutch vullen, German füllen, Gothic fulljan "to fill, make full"), a derivative of adjective *fullaz "full" (see full (adj.)). Related: Filled.

To fill the bill (1882) originally was U.S. theatrical slang, in reference to a star of such magnitude his or her name would be the only one on a show's poster. To fill out "write in required matter" is recorded from 1880.

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wanted (adj.)
1690s, "lacking;" 1812, "sought by the police;" past-participle adjective from want (v.). Wanted poster attested by 1945.
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billing (n.1)
1875, "announcement on a bill or poster," verbal noun from bill (v.) "post as a public notice" (see bill (n.1)); hence top billing (1928). Meaning "act of sending out a bill" is recorded from 1908.
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long-running (adj.)
1943, of theatrical productions, from long (adv.) + present participle of run (v.). Related: Longest-running.
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stagy (adj.)
also stagey, 1845, from stage (n.) in the theatrical sense + -y (2). Related: Staginess.
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off-stage (adj.)

also offstage, "occurring away from a (theatrical) stage," 1915, from off (prep.) + stage (n.).

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hoke (v.)
"overact, act insincerely," 1935, theatrical slang, probably back-formed from hokum. Often with up (adv.).
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