Etymology
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termination (n.)

late 14c., "authoritative resolution of a matter," from Old French terminacion (13c.) and directly from Latin terminationem (nominative terminatio) "a fixing of boundaries, a bounding, determining," noun of action from past-participle stem of terminare "to mark the end or boundary," from terminus "end, limit" (see terminus). Meaning "end of a person's employment" is recorded from 1961; meaning "artificial end of a pregnancy" is attested from 1969; sense of "assassination" is recorded from 1975.

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-i (1)
as a termination in certain people names (Iraqi, Israeli), it represents the common Semitic national designation suffix -i.
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expiry (n.)
"close, termination," 1752, from expire + -y (4). Meaning "dying, death" is from 1790.
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close (n.)

(klōz), late 14c., "act of closing, conclusion, termination," from close (v.). Also in early use "enclosure, enclosed space" (late 13c.), from Old French clos, noun use of the past participle. Specifically in music, "conclusion of a strain or passage," 1590s.

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expiration (n.)

early 15c., expiracioun, "vapor, breath," from Latin expirationem/exspirationem (nominative expiratio/exspiratio) "a breathing out, exhalation," noun of action from past-participle stem of expirare/exspirare "breathe out; breathe one's last" (see expire). Meaning "termination, end, close" is from 1560s.

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conclusion (n.)

late 14c., "deduction or inference reached by reasoning, result of a discussion or examination," from Old French conclusion "conclusion, result, outcome," from Latin conclusionem (nominative conclusio), noun of action from past-participle stem of concludere "to shut up, enclose" (see conclude).

Also, from late 14c. "the end, termination, final part; closing passages of a speech or writing; final result, outcome." For foregone conclusion, see forego.

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Episcopalian 

1738 (n.), 1768 (adj.), from episcopal + -ian. Related: Episcopalianism (by 1821).

The awkward derivative episcopalianism, seems to be used for episcopacy, a good English word, which was quite sufficient for the purposes of our honest forefathers, who were strangers to this ridiculous innovation. The word complained of is also reprehensible on the ground of its sectarian termination. ["On the Terms Episcopalian and Episcopalianism," in The Gospel Advocate, October 1821]
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word-forming element of Greek origin appended to nouns and denoting collective numerals (triad, Olympiad) and fem. patronymics (Dryad, Naiad, also, in plural, Pleiades, Hyades), thence also plant family names; from Greek -as (genitive -ados), fem. suffix equivalent to -is.

From its use in Iliad (literally "of Ilion," that is, "Troy;" from Ilias poiesis or oidos "poem of Ilion," the accompanying noun being feminine, hence the termination) it has formed titles of poems in imitation of it (Columbiad, Dunciad.
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fine (n.)
c. 1200, "termination, end; end of life," from Old French fin "end, limit, boundary; death; fee, payment, finance, money" (10c.), from Latin finis "end" (see finish (v.)), in Medieval Latin also "payment in settlement, fine or tax."

Modern meaning "exaction of money payment for an offense or dereliction" is via sense of "sum of money paid for exemption from punishment or to compensate for injury" (mid-14c., from the same sense in Anglo-French, late 13c.) and from phrases such as to make fine "make one's peace, settle a matter" (c. 1300). Meaning "sum of money imposed as penalty for some offense" is first recorded 1520s.
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prognosis (n.)

1650s, "forecast of the probable course and termination of a case of a disease," from Late Latin prognosis, from Greek prognōsis "foreknowledge," also, in medicine, "predicted course of a disease," from stem of progignōskein "come to know beforehand," from pro- "before" (see pro-) + gignōskein "come to know" (from PIE root *gno- "to know").

An earlier form in the same sense was pronostike (early 15c.), from Medieval Latin pronosticum. The general (non-medical) sense of "a forecast of the course of events" in English is from 1706. A back-formed verb prognose is attested from 1837; the earlier verb was Middle English pronostiken (c. 1400), from Medieval Latin pronosticare.  Related: Prognosed; prognosing.

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