Etymology
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removal (n.)

1590s, "act of taking away entirely;" see remove (v.) + -al (2). From 1640s specifically as "dismissal from an office or a post," also "act of changing one's habitation." Also occasionally a quasi-euphemism for "murder." The earlier noun was remove (n.); also removing, remeving (late 14c.).

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temporary (adj.)

"lasting only for a time," 1540s, from Latin temporarius "of seasonal character, lasting a short time," from tempus (genitive temporis) "time, season" (see temporal, late 14c., which was the earlier word for "lasting but for a time"). The noun meaning "person employed only for a time" is recorded from 1848. Related: Temporarily; temporariness.

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clitoridectomy (n.)

"surgical removal of the clitoris from the body," 1866, from Latinized stem of Greek kleitoris (see clitoris) + -ectomy "a cutting, surgical removal." Originally in reference to a proposed cure for hysteria.

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vasectomy (n.)

1896, from Modern Latin vas (deferens) + -ectomy "a cutting, surgical removal."

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decontrol (n.)

"removal of (government) control," 1919, from de- + control (n.).

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translocation (n.)

"removal from one place to another," 1620s, from trans- + location.

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thoracotomy (n.)

1890, from combining form of thorax + -ectomy "a cutting, surgical removal."

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mastectomy (n.)

surgical removal of a breast, 1909, from masto- "(woman's) breast" + -ectomy "a cutting."

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deamination (n.)

"removal of an amino group," 1912, from de- + amine + noun ending -ation.

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