Etymology
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tedious (adj.)
early 15c., from Old French tedieus, from Late Latin taediosus "wearisome, irksome, tedious," from Latin taedium (see tedium). Related: Tediously; tediousness.
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prosy (adj.)

"like prose," hence "dull, tedious," 1814 (in a letter of Jane Austen), from prose + -y (2). Related: Prosiness.

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tiresome (adj.)
"tedious," c. 1500, from tire (v.) + -some (1). Related: Tiresomely; tiresomeness.
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hoe (v.)
early 15c., "to clear weeds with a hoe," from hoe (n.). Tedious and toilsome work, hence a hard (or long) row to hoe "a difficult task;" hoe (one's) own row "tend to one's affairs." Related: Hoed; hoeing.
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Jobation (n.)
"a long, tedious scolding," 1680s, a jocular formation from Job, the patriarch, with a Latinate noun ending, "in allusion to the rebukes he received from his 'comforters'" [Century Dictionary]. A verb jobe is attested from 1660s.
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nudnik (n.)

"a bore, irritating person," 1947, from Yiddish, with agential suffix -nik + Polish nuda "boredom" or Russian nudnyi "tedious, boring," from Old Church Slavonic *nauda-, from *nauti- "need" (see need (n.)).

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long-winded (adj.)
also longwinded, 1580s, "given to lengthy speeches," from long (adj.) + adjective from wind (n.1) in the secondary Middle English sense "breath in speaking" (early 14c.). "Using much breath," hence "tedious from length."
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overlong (adj.)

early 14c., of text, "too lengthy, requiring too much time, very tedious;" from over- + long (adj.). From late 14c. as "lasting too long." Middle English also had overshort "too short, too brief."

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operose (adj.)

"laborious, tedious, involving much labor," 1670s, from Latin operosus "taking great pains, laborious, active, industrious," from opus (genitive operis) "work" (from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance"). Related: Operosely; operoseness; operosity (1620s).

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preachment (n.)

mid-14c., prechement, "a preaching, a sermon;" earlier "an annoying or tedious speech" (c. 1300), from Old French preechement, from Medieval Latin praediciamentum "preaching, discourse, declaration," from Latin praedicare (see preach (v.)). A doublet of predicament. Related: Preachments.

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