Etymology
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tactile (adj.)

1610s, "perceptible to touch," from French tactile (16c.) and directly from Latin tactilis "tangible, that may be touched," from tactus, past participle of tangere "to touch," from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle." Meaning "of or pertaining to the sense of touch" is attested from 1650s. Related: Tactility.

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property (n.)

c. 1300, properte, "nature, quality, distinctive character always present in an individual or class," later "possession, land or goods owned, things subject to ownership" (early 14c., but this sense is rare before 17c.), from an Anglo-French modification of Old French proprete, "individuality, peculiarity; property" (12c., Modern French propreté) and directly from Latin proprietatem (nominative proprietas) "ownership, a property, propriety, quality," literally "special character" (a loan-translation of Greek idioma), noun of quality from proprius "one's own, special" (see proper). Compare propriety, which is another form of the same French word.

For "possessions, private property" Middle English sometimes used proper goods. Hot property "sensation, a success" is from 1947 in stories in Billboard magazine.

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palp (n.)

"feeler, tactile organ," 1836, from French palpe, German palp, from Latin palpus "feeler," related to palpare "to touch softly, feel," which is of uncertain origin (see palpable).

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propertied (adj.)

"owning or holding property," 1760, from property (n.).

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proprietary (adj.)

mid-15c., of clerics, "possessing worldly goods in excess of needs," from Medieval Latin proprietarius "owner of property," noun use of Late Latin adjective proprietarius "of a property holder," from Latin proprietas "ownership; a property" (see property). Meaning "held in private ownership, belonging to an owner" is attested from 1580s.

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analgesia (n.)

"absence of pain, incapacity of feeling pain in a part, though tactile sense is preserved," 1706, medical Latin, from Greek analgesia "want of feeling, insensibility," from analgetos "without pain, insensible to pain" (also "unfeeling, ruthless"), from an- "not" (see an- (1)) + algein "to feel pain" (see -algia). An alternative form is analgia.

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chattel (n.)

early 13c., chatel "property, goods," from Old French chatel "chattels, goods, wealth, possessions, property; profit; cattle," from Late Latin capitale "property" (see cattle, which is the Old North French form of the same word). Application to slaves is from 1640s and the word later became a rhetorical figure among the abolitionists.

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transfer (n.)

1670s, "conveyance of property," from transfer (v.).

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propriety (n.)

early 15c., "fitness, proper character," from Old French proprieté "individuality, peculiarity; property," a later form of the vernacular proprete (which became English property), from Latin proprietatem (nominative proprietas) "appropriateness," also "ownership" (see property). The meaning "appropriateness, suitableness to an acknowledged or correct standard or rule" is attested from 1610s; the sense of "conformity to good manners" is from 1782.

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hereditament (n.)

"inherited property, anything that can be inherited" (as distinguished from property the ownership of which terminates with the death of the owner), mid-15c., from Medieval Latin hereditamentum, from Latin hereditatem (see heredity).

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