Etymology
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Swiss (n.)

1510s, from French Suisse, from Middle High German Suizer, from Suiz "Switzerland" (see Switzerland and compare Switzer (1570s), archaic word for "a Swiss," and German Schweiz). As an adjective from 1520s. Swiss banks were notable for assuring anonymity and security by 1949. Swiss cheese is attested from 1808; as a type of something full of holes, from 1924.

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homesickness (n.)

1756, translating German Heimweh, from Heim "home" (see home (n.)) + Weh "woe, pain;" the compound is from Swiss dialect, expressing a longing for the mountains, and was introduced to other European languages 17c. by Swiss mercenaries. Also see nostalgia.

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geneva (n.)

1706, alteration (by influence of the Swiss city name) of Dutch genevre, French genière (see gin (n.1)).

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Rorschach 

1927, in reference to a personality test in which the subject is shown a series of standard ink blots and describes what they suggest or resemble; named for its developer, Swiss psychiatrist Hermann Rorschach (1885-1922). The name of the town on the Swiss side of Lake Constance is from an early form of German Röhr "reeds" + Schachen "lakeside."

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guyot (n.)

"flat-topped submarine mountain," 1946, named for Swiss geographer/geologist Arnold Guyot (1807-1884).

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chalet (n.)

1782, "hut or cabin in the Swiss mountains for cattle and herdsmen to shelter for the night," from Swiss-French chalet "herdsman's hut, Alpine cottage," probably a diminutive of Old French chasel "farmhouse, house, abode, hut," perhaps from Vulgar Latin *casalis "belonging to a house," from Latin casa "house;" or from Old Provençal cala "small shelter for ships," from a pre-Latin language [Barnhart].

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Bern 

Swiss capital, probably originally from PIE *ber- "marshy place," but by folk etymology from German Bär "bear" (compare Berlin). Related: Bernese.

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putsch (n.)

"attempted revolution," especially via direct action and rioting in city streets, 1920, from German Putsch "revolt, riot," from Swiss dialect, literally "a sudden blow, push, thrust, shock," of imitative origin (compare put (v.)).

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Gruyere 

kind of cheese, 1802, from Gruyère, the name of the Swiss town and surrounding district where the cheese is made. The place name is said to be ultimately from Latin grus "crane."

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Helvetian (adj.)

"Swiss," 1550s, from Helvetia terra, Medieval Latin name of Switzerland, from Latin Helvetius "pertaining to the Helvetii," a Celtic people of ancient Gallia Lugdunensis. Related: Helvetic.

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