Etymology
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swimming (n.)
late 14c., "act of propelling the body through water," verbal noun from swim (v.). Swimming hole is from 1855, American English; swimming pool is from 1881.
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swimmingly (adv.)
"with steady, smooth progress; in an easy, gliding manner," 1620s, from swimming + -ly (2).
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natatorial (adj.)

"swimming or adapted for swimming," 1805, with -al (1) + natatory (adj.) "swimming" (1799), from Late Latin natatorius "pertaining to a swimmer or swimming," from natator "swimmer" (from PIE root *sna- "to swim").

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dog-paddle (n.)

"type of swimming stroke resembling a dog's swimming," 1860, from dog (n.) + paddle

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natation (n.)

"art or act of swimming," 1540s, from Latin natationem (nominative natatio) "a swimming; a swimming-place," noun of action from past-participle stem of natare "to swim" (from PIE root *sna- "to swim").

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nekton 

collective name for free-swimming aquatic creatures, 1893, from German nekton (van Heusen, 1890), from Greek nekton, neuter of nektos "swimming," from nekhein "to swim" (from PIE root *sna- "to swim"). Compare plankton.

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eurypterid (n.)

fossil swimming crustacean of the Silurian and Devonian, 1874, from Greek eurys "broad, wide" (see eury-) + pteron "feather, wing" (from PIE root *pet- "to rush, to fly"); so called from their swimming appendages.

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sound (n.2)
"narrow channel of water," c. 1300, from Old Norse sund "a strait, swimming," or from cognate Old English sund "act of swimming, stretch of water one can swim across, a strait of the sea," both from Proto-Germanic *sundam-, from *swum-to-, suffixed form of Germanic root *swem- "to move, stir, swim" (see swim (v.)).
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breast-stroke (n.)
method of swimming, 1867, from breast (n.) + stroke (n.). Related: Breast-stroker.
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natatorium (n.)

1890, a New Englandish word for "swimming pool, place for swimming," from Late Latin natatorium, from Latin natator "swimmer" (from nare "to swim") + -ium, neuter suffix. Latin nare is from PIE root *sna- "to swim." Middle English had natatorie "a pool, bath," early 14c., from Latin.

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