Etymology
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surpass (v.)

1550s, from French surpasser "go beyond, exceed, excel" (16c.), from sur- "beyond" (see sur- (1)) + passer "to go by" (see pass (v.)). Related: Surpassed; surpassing.

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unsurpassed (adj.)
1775, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of surpass (v.).
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unsurpassable (adj.)
1610s, from un- (1) "not" + surpassable (see surpass (v.)).
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trump (v.1)
"surpass, beat," 1580s, from trump (n.). Related: Trumped; trumping.
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outgun (v.)

"to surpass in guns, have more firepower than," 1690s, from out- + gun. Related: Outgunned; outgunning.

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outwatch (v.)

1620s, "surpass in watching, watch longer than," from out- + watch (v.). Related: Outwatched; outwatching.

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excel (v.)

c. 1400, transitive, "to surpass, be superior to;" early 15c., intransitive, "be remarkable for superiority, surpass others," from Latin excellere "to rise, surpass, be superior, be eminent," from ex "out from" (see ex-) + -cellere "rise high, tower," related to celsus "high, lofty, great," from PIE root *kel- (2) "to be prominent; hill." Related: Excelled; excelling.

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best (v.)
"to get the better of, outdo, surpass," 1863, from best (adj.). Related: Bested; besting.
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outmaneuver (v.)

also out-maneuver, "surpass in maneuvering," 1799, from out- + maneuver (v.). Related: Outmaneuvered; outmaneuvering.

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outplay (v.)

also out-play, "to play better than, surpass in playing," 1640s, from out- + play (v.). Related: Outplayed; outplaying.

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