Etymology
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supervision (n.)
1630s, from Medieval Latin supervisionem (nominative supervisio), noun of action from past participle stem of supervidere "oversee, inspect" (see supervise).
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oversight (n.)

early 15c., "supervision, superintendence," from over- + sight. Meaning "an omission of notice, a mistake of inadvertence, fact of passing over without seeing" attested from late 15c.; compare oversee.

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inspectorate (n.)
1762, "function or office of an inspector," from inspector + -ate (1). From 1853 as "district under the supervision of an inspector."
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parenting (n.)

"supervision by parents of their children," 1959, verbal noun from parent (v.). An earlier term was parentcraft (1930); also see parentage.

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survey (n.)
late 15c., survei, "oversight, supervision," from survey (v.). The meaning "act of viewing in detail" is from 1540s. Meaning "systematic collection of data on opinions, etc." is attested from 1927.
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day care (n.)

also daycare, day-care, "care and supervision of young children during the day," especially on behalf of working parents, by 1943, American English, from day + care (n.). Early references are to care for children of women working national defense industry jobs. For an earlier word, see baby-farmer.

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Big Ben (n.)
clock-bell in the Parliament tower in London, by 1861, generally said to have been named for Sir Benjamin Hall (1802-1867), first Chief Commissioner of Works, under whose supervision the bell was cast. The name later was extended to the clock itself and its tower.
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exaction (n.)

late 14c., exaccioun, "action of demanding payment; imposition, requisitioning" of taxes, etc., from Old French exaccion and directly from Latin exactionem (nominative exactio) "a driving out; supervision; exaction; a tax, tribute, impost," noun of action from past-participle stem of exigere (see exact (adj.)). Meaning "a tax, tribute, toll, fee," etc. is from mid-15c.

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surveillance (n.)
1802, from French surveillance "oversight, supervision, a watch," noun of action from surveiller "oversee, watch" (17c.), from sur- "over" (see sur- (1)) + veiller "to watch," from Latin vigilare, from vigil "watchful" (from PIE root *weg- "to be strong, be lively"). Seemingly a word that came to English from the Terror in France ("surveillance committees" were formed in every French municipality in March 1793 by order of the Convention to monitor the actions and movements of suspect persons, outsiders, and dissidents).
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intern (n.)
"one working under supervision as part of professional training," originally "assistant resident physician, doctor in training in a hospital," 1879, American English, from French interne "assistant doctor," noun use of interne "internal," from Latin internus "within, inward" (see internal). Extended to other professions (originally teaching) from 1963 in reference to one under training and acquiring practical experience.
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