Etymology
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summit (n.)

c. 1400, "highest point, peak," from Old French somete "summit, top," diminutive of som, sum "highest part, top of a hill," from Latin summum, neuter of noun use of summus "highest," related to super "over" (from PIE root *uper "over"). The meaning "meeting of heads of state" (1950) is from Winston Churchill's metaphor of "a parley at the summit."

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summum bonam (n.)
Latin, literally "highest good" (in ethics), from Cicero; see summit, bene-. Plural summa bona.
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*uper 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "over."

It forms all or part of: hyper-; insuperable; over; over-; sirloin; somersault; soprano; soubrette; sovereign; sum; summit; super-; superable; superb; superior; supernal; supra-; supreme; sur-.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit upari, Avestan upairi "over, above, beyond;" Greek hyper, Latin super "above, over;" Old English ofer "over," German über, Gothic ufaro "over, across;" Gaulish ver-, Old Irish for.
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culmination (n.)

1630s, in astronomy/astrology, "position of a heavenly body when it is on the meridian," from French culmination, noun of action from past participle stem of Late Latin culminare "to top, to crown," from Latin culmen (genitive culminis) "top, peak, summit, roof, gable," also used figuratively, contraction of columen "top, summit" (from PIE root *kel- (2) "to be prominent; hill"). Figurative sense of "highest point or summit" is from 1650s.

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supercilium (n.)
the eyebrow, 1670s, from Latin supercilium "an eyebrow; a ridge, summit;" figuratively "haughtiness, arrogance, pride" (see supercilious).
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culminate (v.)

1640s, in astronomy, of a star or planet, "come to or be on the highest point of altitude; come to or be on the meridian," from Late Latin culminatus past participle of culminare "to top, to crown," from Latin culmen (genitive culminis) "top, peak, summit, roof, gable," also used figuratively, a contraction of columen "top, summit" (from PIE root *kel- (2) "to be prominent; hill"). Figurative sense in English of "reach the highest point" is from 1660s. Related: Culminant; culminated; culminating.

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apex (n.)

"the tip, point, or summit" of anything, c. 1600, from Latin apex "summit, peak, tip, top, extreme end;" which is plausibly related to apere "to fasten, fix," hence "the tip of anything" (one of the meanings of apex in Latin was "small rod at the top of the flamen's cap"), and thus ultimately from PIE *ap- (1) "to take, reach" (see apt). But if the original notion was "point," not "top," it might go another way. Proper plural is apices.

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caput (n.)

"head," in various senses in anatomy, etc., from Latin caput "head," also "leader, guide, chief person; summit; capital city; origin, source, spring," figuratively "life, physical life;" in writing "a division, paragraph;" of money, "the principal sum" (from PIE root *kaput- "head").

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colophon (n.)

"publisher's inscription at the end of a book," 1774, from Late Latin colophon, from Greek kolophōn "summit, final touch" (from PIE root *kel- (2) "to be prominent; hill"). "In early times the colophon gave the information now given on the title page" [OED].

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