Etymology
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suction (n.)
1620s, "act or process of sucking," from Late Latin suctionem (nominative suctio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin sugere "to suck" (see sup (v.2)). As "action produced by a vacuum" from 1650s.
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liposuction (n.)
1983, from Greek lipos "fat, grease" (from PIE root *leip- "to stick, adhere," also used to form words for "fat") + suction (n.).
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tail-pipe (n.)
also tailpipe, 1757, "small pipe fixed at the swell of a musket to receive the ramrod," from tail (n.1) + pipe (n.). From 1832 as "suction pipe of a pump;" 1907 as "exhaust pipe of an automobile."
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cotyledon (n.)

from 1540s in physiology, later in botany, used in various sense, from Latin cotyledon "pennywort, navelwort," from Greek kotyledon "cup-shaped cavity," used of various holes, also "sucker, suction cup," also a plant name, from kotylē "bowl, dish, small cup," also the name of a small liquid measure (nearly a half-pint), in transferred use, "socket, especially of the hip-joint;" a word of uncertain origin [Beekes finds it probably Pre-Greek]. Botanical sense is 1776, from Linnaeus (1751). Related: Cotyledonal.

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