Etymology
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substantial (adj.)
mid-14c., "ample, sizeable," from Old French substantiel (13c.) and directly from Latin substantialis "having substance or reality, material," in Late Latin "pertaining to the substance or essence," from substantia "being, essence, material" (see substance). Meaning "existing, having real existence" is from late 14c. Meaning "involving an essential part or point" is early 15c. Related: Substantially.
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necessity (n.)

late 14c., necessite, "constraining power of circumstances; compulsion (physical or moral), the opposite of liberty; a condition requisite for the attainment of any purpose," from Old French necessité "need, necessity; privation, poverty; distress, torment; obligation, duty" (12c.), from Latin necessitatem (nominative necessitas) "compulsion, need for attention, unavoidableness, destiny," from necesse (see necessary). Meaning "condition of being in need, want of the means of living" in English is from late 14c.

Necessity is the Mother of Invention. [Richard Franck, c. 1624-1708, English author and angler, "Northern Memoirs," 1658]

To maken vertu of necessite is in Chaucer. Related: Necessities.

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answerless (adj.)

"having no answer to give; offering no substantial reply," 1530s, from answer (n.) + -less.

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piece de resistance (n.)

"most important piece or feature," 1831, from French pièce de résistance, originally "the most substantial dish in a meal." Literally "piece of resistance;" there seems to be disagreement as to the exact signification.

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needs (adv.)

"of necessity, necessarily," late 14c. and surviving in archaic constructions involving must, from Middle English nede (see need), used as an adverb reinforcing must (v.), hence the genitive ending.

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necessitarian (n.)

"one who maintains the doctrines of philosophical necessitarianism," which holds that the action of the will is subject to the law of cause and effect (opposed to philosophical libertarianism), 1754, from necessity + -arian. As an adjective from 1739. Related: Necessitarianism.

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insubstantial (adj.)
c. 1600, from Medieval Latin insubstantialis "not substantial," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Late Latin substantialis "having substance or reality, material," in Late Latin "pertaining to the substance or essence," from substantia "being, essence, material" (see substance). Related: Insubstantially.
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tenuous (adj.)
1590s, "thin, unsubstantial," irregularly formed from Latin tenuis "thin, drawn out, meager, slim, slender," figuratively "trifling, insignificant, poor, low in rank," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch," + -ous. The correct form with respect to the Latin is tenuious. The figurative sense of "having slight importance, not substantial" is found from 1817 in English. Related: Tenuously; tenuousness.
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needways (adv.)

"by necessity, by compulsion," early 14c., a northern and Scottish word, marked as obsolete in OED; from need (n.) + way (n.), with adverbial genitive. In a similar sense Middle English also had needgates, needlong (c. 1400).

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