Etymology
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suborder (n.)
also sub-order, 1807 in biology; 1834 in architecture, from sub- + order (n.). Related: Subordinal.
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ornithopod (n.)

1933, short for ornithopod dinosaur (1888), from Modern Latin Ornithopoda (1881), the suborder of dinosaurs whose hind legs are like those of birds, from ornitho- "bird" + Greek podos, genitive of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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oscine (adj.)
"of or pertaining to the singing birds," 1872, from Modern Latin Oscines, the scientific name of the suborder, from Latin oscen (gentitive oscinis) "songbird, bird giving omens by its cry, from assimilated form of ob- "in front of, before" (see ob-) + canere "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing").
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saurian (n.)

reptile of the order Sauria, 1819, from Modern Latin Sauria "the order of reptiles" (Brongniart, 1799), from Greek sauros "lizard" (see -saurus). As an adjective, "belonging to the Sauria," by 1829.

Sauropod for the suborder of the big plant-eating dinosaurs is by 1891, from Modern Latin sauropoda (Marsh, 1884), second element from Greek pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). Sauroid (n.) "a saurian animal" is by 1836, also as an adjective.

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subordinate (adj.)
mid-15c., "having an inferior rank," from Medieval Latin subordinatus "placed in a lower order, made subject," past participle of subordinare "place in a lower order," from Latin sub "under" (see sub-) + ordinare "arrange, set in order," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Related: Subordinance; subordinant; subordinately. For "of or pertaining to the classificatory rank of a suborder," subordinal (1842) is used.
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pinniped (n.)

"a fin-footed mammal," one having feet like fins or flippers, especially of the group of fin-footed aquatic carnivorous quadruped mammals that includes seals, sea-lions, and walruses, 1842, from Modern Latin Pinnipedia, suborder of aquatic carnivorous mammals (seals and walruses), literally "having feet as fins," from Latin pinna in its secondary sense "fin" (see pin (n.)) + pes, genitive pedis "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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