Etymology
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subjugate (v.)
early 15c., a back-formation from subjugation or else from Latin subiugatus, past participle of subiugare "to subjugate, subdue," literally "bring under the yoke," from sub "under" (see sub-) + iugum "yoke," from PIE root *yeug- "to join." Related: Subjugated; subjugating.
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subjugator (n.)
1795, agent noun in Latin form from subjugate.
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*yeug- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to join."

It forms all or part of: adjoin; adjust; conjoin; conjugal; conjugate; conjugation; conjunct; disjointed; enjoin; injunction; jugular; jostle; joust; join; joinder; joint; jointure; junction; juncture; junta; juxtapose; juxtaposition; rejoin (v.2) "to answer;" rejoinder; subjoin; subjugate; subjugation; subjunctive; syzygy; yoga; yoke; zeugma; zygoma; zygomatic; zygote.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit yugam "yoke," yunjati "binds, harnesses," yogah "union;" Hittite yugan "yoke;" Greek zygon "yoke," zeugnyanai "to join, unite;" Latin iungere "to join," iugum "yoke;" Old Church Slavonic igo, Old Welsh iou "yoke;" Lithuanian jungas "yoke," jungti "to fasten to a yoke;" Old English geoc "yoke."

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underdone (adj.)
1680s, in reference to cooked meat, from under + done. Old English underdon (v.), Middle English underdo meant "to put under, to subject, subjugate."
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