Etymology
Advertisement
subdue (v.)
late 14c., "to conquer and reduce to subjection," from Old French souduire, but this meant "deceive, seduce," from Latin subducere "draw away, lead away, carry off; withdraw" (see subduce). The primary sense in English seems to have been taken in Anglo-French from Latin subdere and attached to this word. Related: Subdued; subduing. As an associated noun, subdual is attested from 1670s (subduction having acquired other senses).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
subdued (adj.)
c. 1600, "subjugated," past-participle adjective from subdue. Meaning "calmed down, reduced in intensity" is recorded from 1822.
Related entries & more 
daunt (v.)

c. 1300, "to vanquish, subdue, conquer," from Old French danter, variant of donter (12c., Modern French dompter) "be afraid of, fear, doubt; control, restrain," from Latin domitare, frequentative of domare "to tame" (see tame (v.)). Sense of "to intimidate, subdue the courage of" is from late 15c. Related: Daunted; daunting.

Related entries & more 
overmaster (v.)

mid-14c., overmaistren, "overpower, overcome, subdue, vanquish," from over- + master (v.). Related: Overmastered; overmastering.

Related entries & more 
overawe (v.)

"subdue or control by fear or superior influence," 1570s, from over- + awe (v.). Perhaps coined by Spenser. Related: Overawed; overawing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
subjugation (n.)
late 14c., from Late Latin subiugationem (nominative subiugatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin subiugare "to subdue," literally "bring under the yoke," from sub "under" (see sub-) + iugum "yoke," from PIE root *yeug- "to join."
Related entries & more 
subjugate (v.)
early 15c., a back-formation from subjugation or else from Latin subiugatus, past participle of subiugare "to subjugate, subdue," literally "bring under the yoke," from sub "under" (see sub-) + iugum "yoke," from PIE root *yeug- "to join." Related: Subjugated; subjugating.
Related entries & more 
cinch (v.)

1866, "to pull in, gird with or as with a cinch," from cinch (n.). Figurative meaning "make certain" is from 1891, American English slang, via Western U.S. colloquial sense "bind or subdue by force" (1875). Related: Cinched; cinching.

Related entries & more 
repressive (adj.)

early 15c., in medicine, "serving to check or suppress, tending to subdue," from Old French repressif and directly from Medieval Latin repressivus, from Latin repress-, past-participle stem of reprimere "hold back, curb," figuratively "check, confine, restrain, refrain" (see repress). Related: Repressively.

Related entries & more 
quiet (v.)

late 14c., "subdue (a sensation), lessen (a pain)," from quiet (adj.) and in part from Latin quietare. From mid-15c. as "to make or cause to be quiet;" intransitive sense of "become quiet, be silent" is from 1791 (with down (adv.) by 1851). Related: Quieted; quieting.

Related entries & more