Etymology
Advertisement
artist (n.)

1580s, "one who cultivates one of the fine arts," from French artiste (14c.), from Italian artista, from Medieval Latin artista, from Latin ars (see art (n.)).

Originally especially of the arts presided over by the Muses (history, poetry, comedy, tragedy, music, dancing, astronomy), but also used 17c. for "one skilled in any art or craft" (including professors, surgeons, craftsmen, cooks). Since mid-18c. especially of "one who practices the arts of design or visual arts."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
artistry (n.)

"artistic quality," 1837, from artist + -ry; as chemistry from chemist, etc.

Related entries & more 
cartoonist (n.)

"artist who draws cartoons," 1855, from cartoon (n.) + -ist.

Related entries & more 
strip-tease (n.)

also striptease, 1936, perhaps a back-formation from stripteaser (1930); see strip (v.) + tease (n.). Strip (v.) and tease (v.) both were used in this sense in late 1920s. Life magazine used strippeuse (1938-40).

Related entries & more 
artistic (adj.)

"pertaining to art or artists" in any sense, but especially in the aesthetic sense; also "characterized by conformity with one of the fine arts; displaying excellence of design and execution," 1753, from French artistique, from artiste (see artist). Native artist-like was recorded from 1711; artistly from 1754; artistical from 1798. Related: Artistically.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
leotard (n.)

1881, leotards, named for Jules Léotard (1830-1870), popular French trapeze artist, who performed in such a garment.

Related entries & more 
Houdini (n.)

"escape artist or other ingenious person," 1923, from Harry Houdini, professional name of U.S. escapist Erich Weiss (1874-1926).

Related entries & more 
Phidian (adj.)

by 1809, "of, pertaining to, or produced by Phidias," the most eminent artist of Athens at the height of her glory, 5c. B.C.E.

Related entries & more 
replica (n.)

1824, "a work of art made in exact likeness of another and by the same artist," from Italian replica "copy, repetition, reply," from replicare "to duplicate," from Latin replicare "to repeat," in classical Latin "fold back, fold over, bend back," from re- "back, again" (see re-) + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait").

Properly, a duplicate work made by the same artist and thus considered as an original, not a copy. General sense of "any copy, reproduction, or facsimile" is by 1865.

Related entries & more 
palette (n.)

1620s, "flat, thin tablet, with a hole at one end for the thumb, used by an artist to lay and mix colors," from French palette, from Old French palete "small shovel, blade" (13c.) diminutive of pale "shovel, blade," from Latin pala "spade, shoulder blade," probably from PIE *pag-slo-, suffixed form of root *pag- "to fasten." Transferred sense of "colors used by a particular artist" is from 1882. Palette-knife, originally one used by artists for mixing colors, is attested by 1759.

Related entries & more