Etymology
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strange (adj.)

late 13c., straunge, "from elsewhere, foreign, unknown, unfamiliar, not belonging to the place where found," from Old French estrange "foreign, alien, unusual, unfamiliar, curious; distant; inhospitable; estranged, separated" (Anglo-French estraunge, strange, straunge; Modern French étrange), from Latin extraneus "foreign, external, from without" (source also of Italian strano "strange, foreign," Spanish extraño), from extra "outside of" (see extra-). In early use also strounge. The surname Lestrange is attested from late 12c. Sense of "queer, surprising" is attested from c. 1300, also "aloof, reserved, distant; estranged." In nuclear physics, from 1956.

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estrange (v.)

late 15c., from French estrangier "to alienate," from Vulgar Latin *extraneare "to treat as a stranger," from Latin extraneus "foreign, from without" (see strange). Related: Estranged.

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extraneous (adj.)

"not belonging or proper to a thing; not intrinsic or essential, though attached; foreign," 1630s, from Latin extraneus "external, strange," literally "that is without, from without" (as a noun, "a stranger"), from extra "outside of" (see extra-). A doublet of strange. Related: Extraneously.

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stranger (n.)
late 14c., "unknown person, foreigner," from strange + -er (1) or else from Old French estrangier "foreigner" (Modern French étranger), from estrange. Latin used the adjective extraneus as a noun to mean "stranger." The English noun never picked up the secondary sense of the adjective. As a form of address to an unknown person, it is recorded from 1817, American English rural colloquial. Meaning "one who has stopped visiting" is recorded from 1520s.
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xenophile (n.)

1922, from xeno- "foreign, strange" + -phile.

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xenolith (n.)
1894, from xeno- "foreign, strange" + -lith "stone."
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xenophobe (n.)
1897, from xeno- "foreign, strange" + -phobe. As an adjective from 1908.
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allotheism (n.)
"worship of strange gods," 1650s, from allo- "other" + -theism.
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xenophobia (n.)
1903, from xeno- "foreign, strange" + -phobia "fear." Earlier (c. 1884) it meant "agoraphobia."
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neophilia (n.)

"love of novelty, fondness for what is new, strange, or unaccustomed," 1921; see neo- "new" + -philia.

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