Etymology
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story (n.1)

"connected account or narration of some happening," c. 1200, originally "narrative of important events or celebrated persons of the past," from Old French estorie, estoire "story, chronicle, history," from Late Latin storia, shortened from Latin historia "history, account, tale, story" (see history).

A story is by derivation a short history, and by development a narrative designed to interest and please. [Century Dictionary]

Meaning "recital of true events" first recorded late 14c.; sense of "narrative of fictitious events meant to entertain" is from c. 1500. Not differentiated from history until 1500s. For the sense evolution compare Gaelic seanachas "history, antiquity," also "story, tale, narration," from sean "old, ancient" + cuis "a matter, affair, circumstance."

As a euphemism for "a lie" it dates from 1690s. Meaning "newspaper article" is from 1892. Story-line first attested 1941. That's another story "that requires different treatment" is attested from 1818. Story of my life "sad truth" first recorded 1938, from typical title of an autobiography.

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story (n.2)
"floor of a building," c. 1400, from Anglo-Latin historia "floor of a building" (c. 1200), also "picture," from Latin historia (see history). "Perhaps so called because the front of buildings in the Middle Ages often were decorated with rows of painted windows" [Barnhart].
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story-book (n.)
1711, from story (n.1) + book (n.). As an adjective from 1844.
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story-board (n.)
also storyboard, 1941, from story (n.1) + board (n.1).
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story-telling (n.)
also storytelling, 1709, from story (n.1) + present participle of tell (v.). Related: Story-teller (1709).
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fish-story (n.)

"incredible or extravagant narration," by 1819, U.S. colloquial, from the tendency to exaggerate the size of the catch (or the one that got away). See fish (n. ) + story (n.1).

Do not tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don't tell them where they know the fish. ["Mark Twain," in "More Maxims of Mark" by Merle Johnson (1927)] 
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storied (adj.2)
"having stories or floors" of a certain type or number, 1620s, from story (n.2).
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understory (n.)
in reference to forest vegetation, also under-story, 1902, from under + story (n.).
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multistory (adj.)

also multi-story, multi-storey, "of many stories or floors," 1907, from multi- "many" + story (n.2).

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storied (adj.1)
late 15c., "ornamented with scenes from history" (of books, walls, etc.), from past participle of verb form of story (n.1). Meaning "celebrated in history or legend" is from 1725.
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