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stipulate (v.)
1620s, "bargain, make a contract" (intransitive), back-formation from stipulation, or else from Latin stipulatus, past participle of stipulari "exact (a promise), bargain for." Transitive sense of "demand as a condition" is from 1640s. Related: Stipulated; stipulating.
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condition (v.)

late 15c., "to make conditions, stipulate," from condition (n.). Meaning "subject to something as a condition" is from 1520s; sense of "form a prerequisite of" is from 1868. Meaning "to bring to a desired condition" is from 1844; psychological sense of "teach or accustom (a person or animal) to certain habits or responses" is from 1909. Related: Conditioned; conditioning.

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establish (v.)
late 14c., from Old French establiss-, present participle stem of establir "cause to stand still, establish, stipulate, set up, erect, build" (12c., Modern French établir), from Latin stabilire "make stable," from stabilis "stable" (see stable (adj.)). For the unetymological e-, see e-. Related: Established; establishing. An established church or religion is one sanctioned by the state.
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