Etymology
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wattle (n.1)

"stakes interlaced with twigs and forming the framework of the wall of a building," Old English watol "hurdle," in plural "twigs, thatching, tiles," related to weðel "bandage," from Proto-Germanic *wadlaz, from PIE *au- (3) "to weave" (see weeds). Surviving in wattle-and-daub "building material for huts, etc." (1808).

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wattle (n.2)

"fleshy appendage below the neck of certain birds," 1510s (in jocular use extended to human beings, 1560s), of uncertain origin and of doubtful relationship to wattle (n.1). Related: Wattled.

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stinking (adj.)

late 14c., earlier stinkend, from Old English stincende; present-participle adjective from stink (v.). Modifying drunk, first attested 1887; stinking rich dates from 1956.

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goatish (adj.)

"resembling a goat," especially "stinking" or "lustful," 1520s, from goat + -ish. Related: Goatishly; goatishness.

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fetid (adj.)

early 15c., from Latin fetidus (commonly foetidus) "stinking," from fetere "have a bad smell, stink." This is perhaps connected with fimus "dung," or with fumus "smoke."

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stink-bug (n.)

also stinkbug, 1869, American English, from stink + bug (n.). Compare punaise "bed-bug," also used of other annoying insects, 1510s, from French punaise, noun use of fem. of punais "stinking, fetid."

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brock (n.)

Old English brocc "badger," a borrowing from Celtic (compare Old Irish brocc, Welsh broch), from Proto-Celtic *brokkos. After c. 1400, often with the adjective stinking and meaning "a low, dirty fellow.

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asafetida (n.)

"pungent sap from the roots of several plants native to Persia and Afghanistan," used as a drug, late 14c., from Medieval Latin asa (Latinized from Persian aza "mastic") + foetida, fem. of foetidus "stinking" (see fetid).

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texture (n.)

early 15c., "network, structure," from Latin textura "web, texture, structure," from stem of texere "to weave" (from PIE root *teks- "to weave, to fabricate, to make; make wicker or wattle framework"). Meaning "structural character" is recorded from 1650s. Related: Textural.

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dewlap (n.)

mid-14c., dewelappe, "fold of skin that hangs from the throat of oxen and cows," from lappe "loose piece" (Old English læppa), but the first element is of unknown origin or meaning and probably has been altered by folk-etymology. Old English had fræt-læppa in this sense (Middle English fresh-lappe), and compare Danish doglæp. Later applied to the fleshy fold or wattle of a turkey and also to the human throat when flaccid with age (1580s).

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