Etymology
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statutory (adj.)
"pertaining to statues, depending on statute for authority, required by statute," 1717, from statute + -ory. Statutory rape attested from 1873; in U.S., "sexual intercourse with a female below the legal age of consent, whether forced or not." Related: Statutorily.
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kohlrabi (n.)

also kohl-rabi, kohl rabi, kind of cabbage, turnip cabbage, 1807, from German Kohlrabi (16c.), which is based on Italian cavoli rape, plural of cavolo rapo "cole-rape;" see cole (n.1) + rape (n.2). Form influenced in German by German kohl "cabbage."

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rasp (n.)

"coarse, toothed file," 1540s, from French raspe (Modern French râpe), from Old French rasper "to rasp" (see rasp (v.)).

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enforcement (n.)
late 15c., "constraint, compulsion," from Old French enforcement "strengthening, fortification; rape; compulsion, coercion;" from enforcier; see enforce + -ment. Meaning "compelling of obedience to a law, etc." is from 1680s.
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rapture (n.)

c. 1600, "act of carrying off" as prey or plunder, from rapt + -ure, or else from French rapture, from Medieval Latin raptura "seizure, rape, kidnapping," from Latin raptus "a carrying off, abduction, snatching away; rape" (see rapt). The earliest attested use in English is with women as objects and in 17c. it sometimes meant rape (v.), which word is a cognate of this one.

The sense of "spiritual ecstasy, state of mental transport or exaltation" is recorded by c. 1600 (raptures). The connecting notion is a sudden or violent taking and carrying away. The meaning "expression of exalted or passionate feeling" in words or music is from 1610s.

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indecent (adj.)
1560s, "unbecoming, in bad taste," from French indécent (14c.) or directly from Latin indecentem (nominative indecens) "unbecoming, unseemly," from in- "not, opposite of, without" (see in- (1)) + decens "becoming, seemly, fitting, proper," present participle of decere "to be fitting or suitable," from PIE *deke-, from root *dek- "to take, accept." Sense of "offending against propriety" is from 1610s. Indecent assault (1861) originally covered sexual assaults other than rape or intended rape, but by 1934 it was being used as a euphemism for "rape." Related: Indecently
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