Etymology
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statute (n.)
late 13c., from Old French statut, estatut "(royal) promulgation, (legal) statute," from Late Latin statutum "a law, decree," noun use of neuter past participle of Latin statuere "enact, establish," from status "condition, position," from past participle stem of stare "to stand," from PIE *ste-tu-, from root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."
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title (v.)
"to furnish with a title," early 14c., from title (n.). Related: Titled; titling.
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title (n.)

c. 1300, "inscription, heading," from Old French title "title or chapter of a book; position; legal permit" (12c., Modern French titre, by dissimilation), and in part from Old English titul, both from Latin titulus "inscription, label, ticket, placard, heading; honorable appellation, title of honor," of unknown origin. Meaning "name of a book, play, etc." first recorded mid-14c. The sense of "name showing a person's rank" in English is first attested 1580s. Sports championship sense attested from 1913 (originally in lawn tennis), hence titlist (1913). A title role in theater is one which gives its name to the play.

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statutory (adj.)
"pertaining to statues, depending on statute for authority, required by statute," 1717, from statute + -ory. Statutory rape attested from 1873; in U.S., "sexual intercourse with a female below the legal age of consent, whether forced or not." Related: Statutorily.
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enactment (n.)
1766, "passing of a bill into law," from enact + -ment. Meaning "a law, statute" is by 1783. Earlier was enaction 1620s.
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enrollment (n.)

also enrolment, mid-15c., "act of enrolling, official copy or record of a statute," from Anglo-French enrollement, from Old French enroller "record in a register" (see enroll). Meaning "total number enrolled" is from 1859, American English.

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subtitle (n.)
also sub-title, 1825, "subordinate or additional title, usually explanatory," in reference to literary works, from sub- "under" + title (n.). Applied to motion pictures by 1908. As a verb from 1858. Related: Subtitled.
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common law (n.)

mid-14c., "the customary and unwritten laws of England as embodied in commentaries and old cases" (see common (adj.)), as opposed to statute law. Phrase common-law marriage is attested from 1909.

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titrate (v.)
1854, with -ate (2) + French titrer, from titre "standard, title," also "fineness of alloyed gold" (see title (n.)).
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annulment (n.)
late 15c., "act of reducing to nothing;" see annul + -ment. Meaning "act of declaring invalid" (a statute, marriage, etc.) is recorded from 1660s; earlier in this sense was annulling (late 14c.).
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