Etymology
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sports (n.)

atheltic games and contests, 1590s, from sport (n.). Meaning "sports section of a newspaper" is 1913. As an adjective from 1897. Sports fan attested from 1921. Sports car attested by 1914; so called for its speed and power:

I have just returned from the south of France, passing through Lyons, where I visited the [Berliet] works with my car, and was shown the new model 25 h.p. "sports" car, and was so impressed with this that I immediately ordered one on my return to London. [letter in The Autocar, Jan. 7, 1914]
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equipment (n.)
1717, "things equipped;" 1748, "action of equipping;" from equip + -ment, or from French équipement. Superseding earlier equipage.
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sportswear (n.)
also sports-wear, 1912, from sports (n.) + wear (n.). Hence sports coat, sports shirt, etc.
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right wing (n.)

1570s of armies; from 1882 in field sports; by 1905 in the political sense (compare left wing). Right-winger is attested by 1919 in U.S. politics; 1895 in sports.

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sportsman (n.)
1706, from sports + man (n.). Sportswoman attested from 1754.
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attire (n.)
c. 1300, "equipment of a man-at-arms; apparel, dress, clothes," from attire (v.).
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pot-holder (n.)

also potholder, "something to cover and protect the hand when handling hot kitchen equipment," the cloth variety so called by 1902, from pot (n.1) + holder.

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parrel (n.)

late 15c., pariel, "rope or chain that fixes the middle of a yard to a mast," from parel "equipment" (c. 1400), earlier "apparel" (early 14c.), a shortening of apparel (n.).

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spotlight (n.)

1904, from spot (n.) + light (n.). Originally a theatrical equipment; figurative sense is attested from 1916. The verb is attested by 1923.

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