Etymology
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goods (n.)
"property," late 13c., from plural of good (n.), which had the same sense in Old English. Meaning "saleable commodities" is mid-15c.; colloquial sense of "stolen articles" is from 1900; hence figurative use, "evidence of guilt."
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sporting (adj.)
c. 1600, "playful;" 1799 as "characterized by conduct constant with that of a sportsman" (as in sporting chance, 1897), present-participle adjective from sport (v.).
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gun-shy (adj.)
1849, originally of sporting dogs, from gun (n.) + shy (adj.).
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misfield (v.)
1870, from mis- (1) + field (v.) in the sporting sense. Related: Misfielded; misfielding.
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assist (n.)
1570s, "an act of assistance," from assist (v.). In the sporting sense attested 1877 in baseball, 1925 in ice hockey.
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shoplifting (n.)

"the pilfering of goods from a shop," 1690s, from shoplifter.

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no-name (adj.)

1978, "not having made a name in one's profession," originally American English sporting jargon, from no + name (n.). As a noun, by 1984.

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shipment (n.)

1802, "act of shipping, putting of goods on board for transport;" 1861, "that which is shipped, a quantity of goods delivered at one time by conveyance;" see ship (v.) + -ment.

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spectate (v.)
"to attend (a sporting event, etc.) to watch, not participate," 1929, back-formation from spectator. Related: Spectated; spectating. Related: Spectation.
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