Etymology
Advertisement
splash (v.)
1715 (intransitive); 1722 (transitive), probably an alteration of plash with an intensive s-. Related: Splashed; splashing. Splash-board attested from 1826. Splash-down (n.) in the spacecraft sense is attested from 1961.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
splash (n.)
1736, "water or liquid thrown upon anything," from splash (v.). Meaning "striking or ostentatious display" is first attested 1804. Sense of "small quantity of soda water, etc., added to a drink" is from 1922. Of color or light, 1832.
Related entries & more 
splashy (adj.)

1727, "full of puddles," from splash (n.) + -y (2). Meaning "sensational" is attested by 1836. Related: Splashily; splashiness.

Related entries & more 
plash (v.1)

"to splash, dabble in water," 1580s, from plash (n.) and also imitative (compare Dutch plassen, German platschen). An earlier form of splash. Related: Plashed; plashing.

Related entries & more 
splosh (v.)
1889 [in Farmer, who calls it "A New England variant of splash"], ultimately imitative. Perhaps influenced by splish-splosh "sound made by feet walking through wet" (1881). Related: Sploshed; sploshing.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
splutter (n.)
1670s, perhaps a variant of sputter, intensified by the consonant cluster of splash, splatter, etc.
Related entries & more 
splatter (v.)
1784 (but earlier in splatterdash (1772), variant of spatterdash); perhaps a blend of spatter and splash.
Related entries & more 
bukkake (n.)

1990s, from Japanese, said to be a noun derived from bukkakeru "to dash or sprinkle (water), thus "a splash."

Related entries & more 
slosh (v.)
"to splash about in mud or wet," 1844, from slosh (n.). Meaning "to pour carelessly" is recorded from 1875. Related: Sloshed; sloshing.
Related entries & more 
swash (v.)
1580s, "spill or splash (water) about," 1530s, possibly from wash (v.) with an intensifying s-, or imitative of the sound of water dashing against solid objects. Related: Swashed; swashing.
Related entries & more