Etymology
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southwestern (adj.)
Old English suðwesterne; see southwest + -ern. In reference to a section of the U.S., from 1806, when it meant "Mississippi and Alabama."
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Cadiz 
port city in southwestern Spain, from Latin Gades (Greek Gadeira), from Phoenician gadir "fort, enclosure." Related: Gaditan (from Latin adjective Gaditanus).
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whortleberry (n.)
1570s, southwestern England variant of hurtleberry (see huckleberry).
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Wessex 
Anglo-Saxon kingdom in southern England, literally "(land of the) West Saxons;" see west + Saxon. Modern use in reference to southwestern England (excluding Cornwall) is from Hardy's novels.
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Kanarese (n.)
Dravidian language of southwestern India, formerly Canarese, now known as Kannada.
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Girondist (n.)
1795, member of the moderate republican party of France, 1791-93, from Gironde, name of a department in southwestern France; the faction so called because its leaders were deputies elected from there.
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Tlingit (n.)
Indian group in southwestern Alaska and adjacent parts of Canada, 1865, the people's word for themselves, literally "human beings."
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Lycia 
ancient name of a mountainous district of southwestern Asia Minor, inhabited in ancient times by a distinct people, influential in Greece. The name is perhaps related to Greek lykos "wolf." Related: Lycian.
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Anglo (n.)
"American, English-speaking white person," 1941, southwestern U.S., from Anglo-American. Anglo was used similarly of native, English-speakers in Canada from 1800 and Britain from 1964.
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Aquitaine 
historical duchy in southwestern France, from Latin Aquitania, the first element from aqua "water" (from PIE root *akwa- "water"), the second probably meaning "land, province." Related: Aquitanian.
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