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17 entries found
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snub (n.)
"rebuke, intentional slight," 1530s, from snub (v.).
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snub (v.)
mid-14c., "to check, reprove, rebuke," from Old Norse snubba "to curse, chide, snub, scold, reprove." The ground sense is perhaps "to cut off," and the word probably is related to snip. Compare Swedish snobba "lop off, snuff (a candle)," Old Norse snubbotr "snubbed, nipped, with the tip cut off." Meaning "treat coldly" appeared early 18c. Related: Snubbed; snubbing.
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snub (adj.)
"short and turned up," 1725, in snub-nosed, from snub (v.). The connecting notion is of being "cut short."
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red-nosed (adj.)

c. 1600, typically in reference to drunkenness, from red (adj.1) + nose (n.). Red-nose (adj.) indicating "drunken" is by 1580s.

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hard-nosed (adj.)
"stubborn," 1927, from hard (adj.) + nose (n.). Earlier of bullets or shells with hard tips, and of dogs that had difficulty following a scent. Not in common use before 1950s, when it begins to be applied to tough or relentless characters generally (Damon Runyon characters, U.S. Marines, Princeton professors, etc.). Soft-nosed seems to have been used only of bullets.
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simian (adj.)
"characteristic of monkeys or apes," c. 1600, from Latin simia "ape," from simus "snub-nosed," from Greek simos "snub-nosed" (like the Scythians), also a masculine proper name, of unknown origin. Biological meaning "pertaining to monkeys" is from 1863. The noun meaning "an ape or monkey" first is attested in 1880.
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Simon 
masc. proper name, from Latin, from Greek Symeon, from Hebrew Shim'on, literally "hearkening, hearing," from shama "he heard." In English Old Testaments, usually printed as Simeon, but in New Testament almost always as Simon. Confused with Greek masc. proper name Simon, which is from simos "snub-nosed."
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rebuff (v.)

"make blunt resistance to, put off with abrupt denial," 1580s, from obsolete French rebuffer "to check, snub," from Italian ribuffare "to check, chide, snide," from ribuffo "a snub," from ri- "back" (from Latin re-, see re-) + buffo "a puff," a word of imitative origin (compare buffoon, also buffet (n.2)). Related: Rebuffed; rebuffing.

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nose (v.)

1570s, "perceive the smell of;" 1640s; "pry, search in a meddlesome way;" from nose (n.). Related: Nosed; nosing.

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bottle-nose (n.)
1630s as a type of nose, 1660s as a type of porpoise, from bottle (n.) + nose (n.). Related: Bottle-nosed (1560s).
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