Etymology
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snarl (v.2)

"growl and bare the teeth," 1580s, perhaps from Dutch or Low German snarren "to rattle," probably of imitative origin (compare German schnarren "to rattle," schnurren "to hum, buzz"). Meaning "speak in a harsh manner" first recorded 1690s. Related: Snarled; snarling.

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snarl (v.1)

"to tangle, to catch in a snare or noose" (trans.), late 14c., from a noun snarl "a snare, a noose" (late 14c.), probably a diminutive of snare (n.1). Intransitive sense "become twisted or entangled" is from c. 1600. Related: Snarled; snarling.

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snarl (n.2)

"a sharp growl accompanied by a display of the teeth," 1610s, from snarl (v.2).

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snarl (n.1)

late 14c., "a snare, noose," from snarl (v.1). Meaning "a tangle, a knot" is first attested c. 1600. Meaning "a traffic jam" is from 1933.

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snarky (adj.)

"irritable, short-tempered," 1906, from snark (v.) "to find fault with, nag" (1882), literally "to snort" (1866), from an imitative source akin to Low German snarken, North Frisian snarke, Swedish snarka; and compare snarl (v.2), sneer (v.). Also compare narky "bad-tempered, sarcastic" (1895), British slang from earlier nark "annoying, quarrelsome, or unpleasant person" (1846), from nark (q.v.).

It seems to have emerged anew as a vogue word c. 1997 to indicate a "hostile, knowing, bitter tone of contempt." The back-formation snark (n.) "caustic, opinionated, and critical rhetoric" is by c. 2002 (compare snark (n.)). Related: Snarkily; snarkiness.

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tangle (n.)

1610s, "a tangled condition, a snarl of threads," from tangle (v.).

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schnauzer (n.)

breed of terrier with a bearded muzzle, 1923, from German Schnauzer, literally "growler," from schnauzen "to snarl, growl," from Schnauze "snout, muzzle," which is related to Middle English snute, snoute "snout" (see snout).

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schnorrer (n.)

"a scrounger, a vagabond," 1892 (Zangwill), originally "a Jewish beggar," from Yiddish, "beggar," from German slang schnurrer, from schnurren "to go begging" (slang), which is perhaps ultimately imitative of the sound of pleading or whining (compare sneer, snorkel, snarl).

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Norn (n.)

one of the three female fates of Scandinavian mythology, whose decrees were irrevocable, 1770, from Old Norse norn (plural nornir), which is related to Swedish dialectal norna "to warn, to communicate secretly," perhaps ultimately imitative of low murmuring (compare Middle High German narren "to growl, snarl").

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gnarl (v.)

"contort, twist, make knotty," 1814, a back-formation from gnarled (q.v.). As a noun from 1824, "a knotty growth on wood." Earlier an identical verb was used imitatively in a sense of "to snarl" like a dog (1590s); Farmer and Henley ("Slang and Its Analogues") lists gnarler as thieves' slang for "a watch-dog."

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