Etymology
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slumber (n.)

mid-14c., from slumber (v.). Slumber party is attested by 1942. Slumberland is from 1875.

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slumber (v.)
mid-14c. alteration of slumeren (mid-13c.), frequentative form of slumen "to doze," probably from Old English sluma "light sleep" (compare Middle Dutch slumen, Dutch sluimeren, German schlummern "to slumber"). Frequentative on the notion of "intermittent light sleep." For the -b-, compare number, lumber, chamber, etc. Related: Slumbered; slumbering.
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nystagmus (n.)

"involuntary motion of the eyes," 1790, medical Latin, from Greek nystagmos "nodding, drowsiness," from nystazein "to nod, slumber, be sleepy," from PIE *sneud(h)- "to be sleepy." Beekes compares Baltic words such as Lithuanian snūsti "to slumber away." Related: Nystagmatic.

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dorm (n.)

"residence hall of a U.S. college or university," 1900, colloquial shortening of dormitory. Earlier it meant "a slumber, a doze" (1510s), from the stem of the Latin verb.

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somni- 
before vowels somn-, word-forming element meaning "sleep," from combining form of Latin somnus "sleep, slumber," from PIE root *swep- "to sleep."
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nap (v.1)

"have a short sleep," Middle English nappen, from Old English hnappian (Mercian hneappian) "to doze, slumber, sleep lightly," a word of unknown origin, apparently related to Old High German hnaffezan, German dialectal nafzen, Norwegian napp. In Middle English also "be sleepy, be inattentive or careless." Related: Napped; napping.

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asleep (adj.)
c. 1200, aslepe, o slæpe, "in or into a state of slumber," from Old English on slæpe (see a- (1) + sleep (n.)). The parallel form on sleep continued until c. 1550. In religious literature sometimes euphemistic or figurative for "dead" (late 13c.). Meaning "inattentive, off guard" is from mid-14c. Of limbs, "numb and having a prickly feeling through stoppage of circulation," from late 14c.
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doze (v.)

"to sleep lightly or fitfully; fall into a light sleep unintentionally," 1640s, probably from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Norse dusa "to doze," Danish døse "to make dull," Swedish dialectal dusa "to sleep") and related to Old English dysig "foolish" (see dizzy). Perhaps originally a dialect word in English and earlier than the attested date. Related: Dozed; dozing. As a noun, "a light sleep or slumber," from 1731. To doze off is by 1829.

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rouse (v.)

mid-15c., rousen, intransitive, probably from Anglo-French or Old French reuser, ruser; Middle English Compendium compares 16c. French rousee "abrupt movement." Sometimes also said to be from Latin recusare "refuse, decline," with loss of the medial -c-. Originally in English a technical term in hawking, "to shaking the feathers of the body," but like many medieval hawking and hunting terms it is of obscure origin.

The sense of "cause game to rise from cover or lair" is from 1520s. The word became general from 16c. in the figurative, transitive, meaning "stir up, cause to start up by noise or clamor, provoke to activity; waken from torpor or inaction" (1580s); that of "to awaken, cause to start from slumber or repose" is recorded by 1590s. Related: Roused; rousing.

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sluggard (n.)

late 14c., late 13c. as a surname, "habitually lazy person," from Middle English sluggi "sluggish, indolent," probably from a Scandinavian word such as dialectal Norwegian slugga "be sluggish," dialectal Norwegian sluggje "heavy, slow person," dialectal Swedish slogga "to be slow or sluggish." Adjective sluggy is attested in English from early 13c. As an adjective meaning "sluggish, lazy" from 1590s. Related: Sluggardly.

'Tis the voice of a sluggard — I heard him complain:
"You have wak'd me too soon, I must slumber again."
[Isaac Watts, 1674-1748]

***

'Tis the voice of the Lobster: I heard him declare
"You have baked me too brown, I must sugar my hair."
["Lewis Carroll" (Charles L. Dodgson), 1832-1898]
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