Etymology
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skirt (n.)
early 14c., "lower part of a woman's dress," from Old Norse skyrta "shirt, a kind of kirtle;" see shirt. Sense development from "shirt" to "skirt" is possibly related to the long shirts of peasant garb (compare Low German cognate Schört, in some dialects "woman's gown"). Sense of "border, edge" (in outskirts, etc.) first recorded late 15c. Metonymic use for "women collectively" is from 1550s; slang sense of "young woman" is from 1906; skirt-chaser first attested 1942.
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chaser (n.)

c. 1300, "horse trained for chasing," agent noun from chase (v.), probably in some cases from Old French chaceor "huntsman, hunter." Meaning "water or mild beverage taken after a strong drink" is by 1894, U.S. colloquial. French had chasse (from chasser "to chase") "a drink of liquor taken (or said to be taken) to kill the aftertaste of coffee or tobacco," which was used in English from c. 1800.

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skirt (v.)
c. 1600, "to border, form the edge of," from skirt (n.). Meaning "to pass along the edge" is from 1620s. Related: Skirted; skirting.
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chasse (n.)

French chassé "chase, chasing," past participle of chasser "to chase, hunt" (see chase (v.)), borrowed 19c. into English in a variety of senses and expressions, such as "chaser" (in the drinking sense), short for chasse-café, literally "coffee-chaser." Also as a dance step (1867).

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miniskirt (n.)

also mini-skirt, "skirt with a hem-line well above the knee," 1965, from mini- + skirt (n.); reputedly the invention of French fashion designer André Courrèges (1923-2016).

"The miniskirt enables young ladies to run faster, and because of it, they may have to." [John V. Lindsay, New York Times, Jan. 13, 1967]

Related: Miniskirted.

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longeron (n.)
airplane part, 1912, from French longeron, from longer "to skirt, extend along," from allonger "to lengthen" (see lunge (n.)).
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A-line (adj.)
descriptive of a dress or skirt flared in shape of a capital letter "A," 1955, in reference to the creations of French fashion designer Christian Dior (1905-1957).
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bustle (n.2)

"padding in the upper back part of a skirt," 1788, of uncertain origin, perhaps from German Buschel "bunch, pad," or it might be a special use of bustle (n.1) with reference to "rustling motion."

BUSTLE. A pad stuffed with cotton, feathers, bran, &c., worn by ladies for the double purpose of giving a greater rotundity or prominence to the hips, and setting off the smallness of the waist. [Bartlett, "Dictionary of Americanisms," 1848]

Century Dictionary (1895) notes that, in addition to "improving the figure" it causes the folds of the skirt to hang gracefully and prevents the skirt from interfering with the feet in walking.

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jupe (n.)
late 13c., "men's loose jacket," from Old French jupe "tunic worn under the armor," also a gown or woman's skirt (12c.), from Arabic jubbah "loose outer garment." As a woman's bodice, from 1810. Jupon is from a French variant form.
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sarong (n.)

skirt-like garment worn over the lower body by both sexes, the Malay national garment, 1834, from Malay (Austronesian) sarung "sheath, covering." OED traces it to "some mod. form of Skr. saranga 'variegated.' "

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