Etymology
Advertisement
Philip 

masc. proper name, most famously in classical history king of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great (compare philippic); the from Latin Philippus, from Greek Philippos "fond of horses," from philos "beloved, loving" (see philo-) + hippos "horse" (from PIE root *ekwo- "horse"). Skelton made it the name applied to a common sparrow (perhaps from resemblance to the bird's call). In 16c., Philip and Cheyney was a way to say "any two common men."

You remember the story of the poor woman who importuned King Philip of Macedon to grant her justice, which Philip refused : the woman exclaimed, "I appeal" : the king, astonished, asked to whom she appealed : the woman replied, "From Philip drunk to Philip sober." [Emerson, "New England Reformers," 1844]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Anthony 

masc. proper name, from Latin Antonius, name of a Roman gens (with an unetymological -h- probably suggested by many Greek loan words beginning anth-, such as anthros "flower," anthropos "man").

St. Anthony (4c.), Egyptian hermit, was patron saint of swineherds, to whom one of each litter was usually vowed, hence Anthony for "smallest pig of the litter" (1660s; in condensed form tantony pig from 1590s). St. Anthony's Fire (1520s), popular name for erysipelas, is said to be so called from the tradition that those who sought his intercession recovered from that distemper during a fatal epidemic in 1089.

Related entries & more 
sir 

title of honor of a knight or baronet (until 17c. also a title of priests), c. 1300, a variant of sire (q.v.) that was used originally only in unstressed position. It is not an acronym of anything.

It was generalized as a respectful form of address by mid-14c., and eventually extended to all equals or used without regard for rank. It has been used as a salutation at the beginning of letters from early 15c. As a noun, "person of rank or importance," from 14c.

Related entries & more 
Antonia 

fem. proper name, from Latin Antonia, fem. of Antonius (see Anthony).

Related entries & more 
Dramamine 

proprietary name of dimenhydrinate, an anti-nausea drug, 1949. Said to have been developed originally as an anti-allergy drug at Johns Hopkins.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Philippa 

fem. proper name, modern, fem. of Philip.

Related entries & more 
Antonine (adj.)

1680s, in reference to Roman emperors Antoninus Pius (ruled 138-161 C.E.) and Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (161-180). For the name, see Anthony. Earlier (1540s) of the followers of St. Anthony of Egypt; later Antonian (1904) was used in this sense.

Related entries & more 
Philippines 

archipelago in southeast Asia at the western edge of the Pacific Ocean, from Spanish Islas Filipinas, literally "the islands of Philip," named 1542 by Spanish explorer Ruy López de Villalobos in honor of Philip, Prince of Asturias, who was later Philip II, king of Spain. Related: Philippine. Other early names for then in Spanish included Islas del Poniente "Islands of the West."

Related entries & more 
Antony 

masc. proper name, from Latin Antonius, name of a Roman gens (see Anthony).

Related entries & more 
Epstein-Barr virus 

1968, named for British virologist Michael Anthony Epstein and Irish-born virologist Yvonne M. Barr.

Related entries & more