Etymology
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slipshod (adj.)
1570s, "wearing slippers or loose shoes," from slip (v.) + shod "wearing shoes." Sense of "slovenly, careless" is from 1815, probably from the notion of appearing like one in slippers, or whose shoes are down at the heels.
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strapless (adj.)
1824 of shoes, 1839 of trousers, 1920 of gowns, 1931 of brassieres, from strap (n.) + -less.
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strappy (adj.)
of shoes, etc., by 1970, from strap (n.) + -y (2).
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goody (n.2)
1550s, a shortened form of goodwife, a term of civility applied to a married woman in humble life; hence Goody Two-shoes, name of the heroine in 1760s children's story ("The History of little Goody Two Shoes; otherwise called Mrs. Margery Two Shoes") who exulted upon acquiring a second shoe.
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shoe-shine (adj.)
1911, from shoe (n.) + shine (n.). One who shines shoes for money was a shoeblacker (1755).
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gumshoe (n.)
"plainclothes detective," 1906, from the rubber-soled shoes they wore (allowing stealthy movement), which were so called from 1863 (gums "rubber shoes" is attested by 1859); from gum (n.1) + shoe (n.).
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chork (v.)
mid-15c., now Scottish, "to make the noise which the feet do when the shoes are full of water" [Jamieson]. Related: Chorked; chorking.
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souter (n.)
"maker or mender of shoes," Old English sutere, from Latin sutor "shoemaker," from suere "to sew, stitch" (from PIE root *syu- "to bind, sew").
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clump (v.2)

"walk heavily and clumsily," 1660s, imitative, or perhaps from the notion of walking in wooden shoes (see clump (n.)). Related: Clumped; clumping.

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Cracow 

the older Englishing of Krakow, the city in Poland. The long-toed, pointed shoes or boots called crakows that were popular in England 15c. are attested from late 14c., so called because they were supposed to originate there. They also yielded a Middle English verb, crakouen "to provide (shoes or boots) with long, pointed toes" (early 15c.). Related: Cracovian.

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