Etymology
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No results were found for shitting. Showing results for sitting.
sitting (n.)
early 13c., verbal noun from sit (v.). Meaning "a meeting of a body" is from c. 1400. Meaning "interval during which one sits" (for some purpose, especially to have one's portrait taken) is from 1706. Sitting-room first recorded 1771. Slang sitting duck "easy target" first recorded 1944; literal sense is from 1867 (it is considered not sporting to shoot at one).
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seance (n.)
1789, "sitting, session," as of a learned society, from French séance "a sitting," from seoir "to sit," from Latin sedere "to sit," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." Meaning "spiritualistic session" first recorded 1845.
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ephedra (n.)
genus of low, branchy desert shrubs, 1914, from Modern Latin (1737) from Greek ephedra, a name given by Pliny to the horsetail, literally "sitting upon," from fem. of ephedros "sitting or seated upon; sitting at or near," from epi "on" (see epi-) + hedra "seat, base, chair; face of a geometric solid," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." The reason for the name is not known.
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sessile (adj.)
1725, "adhering close to the surface," from Latin sessilis "pertaining to sitting, for sitting on," from sessus, past participle of sedere "to sit," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." In botany from 1753. Meaning "sedentary" first recorded 1860.
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session (n.)

late 14c., "periodical sitting of a court," from Old French session "act or state of sitting; assembly," from Latin sessionem (nominative sessio) "act of sitting; a seat; loitering; a session," noun of action from past participle stem of sedere "to sit" (from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit"). Sense of "period set aside for some activity" is first recorded 1920, in bull session, probably from quarter sessions courts (see quarter (n.1)). Musical sense of "recording occasion in a studio" is from 1927.

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yeshiva (n.)
"Orthodox Jewish college or seminary," 1851, from Hebrew yesibah "academy," literally "a sitting," from yashav "to sit."
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flagpole (n.)
also flag-pole, 1782, from flag (n.1) + pole (n.1). Flagpole-sitting as a craze is attested from 1927.
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sit-down (adj.)
1836 of meals, 1936 of strikes, from verbal phrase (c. 1200), from sit (v.) + down (adv.); as a noun, sit-down "act of sitting down" is from 1861.
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sooterkin (n.)
1680s, imaginary rat-like after-birth believed to be gotten by Dutch women by sitting over stoves, 1680s.
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sitz-bath (n.)
1849, a hybrid, from German Sitzbad, literally "bath in a sitting position," from German sitzen (see sit (v.)) with English bath for German Bad.
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