Etymology
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entity (n.)

1590s, "being," from Late Latin entitatem (nominative entitas), from ens (genitive entis) "a thing," proposed by Caesar as present participle of esse "be" (see is), to render Greek philosophical term to on "that which is" (from neuter of present participle of einai "to be," from PIE root *es- "to be"). Originally abstract; concrete sense in English is from 1620s.

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shell (n.)

"hard outer covering," Middle English shel, shelle, from Old English sciell, scill, Anglian scell "seashell; eggshell," which is related to Old English scealu "shell, husk," from Proto-Germanic *skaljo "piece cut off; shell; scale" (source also of West Frisian skyl "peel, rind," Middle Low German schelle "pod, rind, egg shell," Gothic skalja "tile"), with the shared notion of "covering that splits off," from PIE root *skel- (1) "to cut." Italian scaglia "chip" is from Germanic.

Also in late Old English as "a coating or layer." The general sense of "protective outer covering of some invertebrates" is in Middle English (by c. 1400 as "house of a snail;" by 1540s in reference to a tortoise or turtle); the meaning "outer layer of a nut" (or a fruit considered as a nut) is by mid-14c. With notion of "mere exterior," hence "empty or hollow thing" by 1650s. The meaning "hollow framework" is from 1791; that of "structure for a band or orchestra" is attested from 1938. To be out of (one's) shell "emerged into life" is by 1550s.

Military use for "explosive projectile" is by 1640s, first of hand grenades, and originally in reference to the metal case in which the gunpowder and shot were mixed; the notion is of a "hollow object" filled with explosives. Hence shell shock, "traumatic reaction to the stress of battle," recorded by 1915.

Shell game "a swindle" is from 1890, from a version of the three-card game played with a pea and walnut shells.

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shell (v.)

1560s, "to remove (a nut, etc.) from its shell," from shell (n.). The general sense of "remove or strip off the outer covering of" is by 1690s. It also can mean "enclose in a case" (1630s). The military meaning "bombard with shells" is attested by 1856. To shell out "disburse, hand over, deliver" (1801) is a figurative slang use from the image of extracting nuts. Related: Shelled; shelling.

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non-entity (n.)

also nonentity, c. 1600, "something which does not exist, a figment," from non- + entity. Meaning "a person or thing of no consequence or importance" is attested from 1710.

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hard-shell (adj.)
1838 of Baptists (figuratively); 1798 of clams; see hard (adj.) + shell (n.). Hard-shelled is from 1610s.
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clam-shell (n.)

c. 1500, "the shell of a clam;" see clam (n.) + shell (n.). As "hinged iron box or bucket used in dredging" from 1877.

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seashell (n.)

also sea-shell, "shell of any salt-water mollusk; shell found on the seashore," Old English sæscel; see sea and shell (n.).

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shelled (adj.)

1570s, "having a shell;" past-participle adjective from shell (v.). Attested from 1670s in the sense of "deprived of a shell." Military use for "bombarded by shells" is from 1850s.

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ontic (adj.)

a word in philosophy, variously defined but in general "pertaining to the existence of structure in an entity," 1949, from onto- + -ic.

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non-exclusive (adj.)

also nonexclusive, "not restricted to any group, entity, or region, available to all," 1836, from non- + exclusive. Related: non-exclusively; non-exclusiveness.

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