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sharp (adj.)
Old English scearp "having a cutting edge; pointed; intellectually acute, active, shrewd; keen (of senses); severe; biting, bitter (of tastes)," from Proto-Germanic *skarpaz, literally "cutting" (source also of Old Saxon scarp, Old Norse skarpr, Old Frisian skerp, Dutch scherp, German scharf "sharp"), from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut" (source also of Lettish skarbs "sharp," Middle Irish cerb "cutting").

The figurative meaning "acute or penetrating in intellect or perception" was in Old English; hence "keenly alive to one's own interests, quick to take advantage" (1690s). Of words or talk, "cutting, sarcastic," from early 13c. Meaning "distinct in contour" is from 1670s. The adverbial meaning "abruptly" is from 1836; that of "promptly" is first attested 1840. The musical meaning "half step above (a given tone)" is from 1570s. Meaning "stylish" is from 1944, hepster slang, from earlier general slang sense of "excellent" (1940). Phrase sharp as a tack first recorded 1912 (sharp as a needle has been around since Old English). Sharp-shinned attested from 1704 of persons, 1813 of hawks.
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sharp (n.)
"a cheat at games," 1797, short for sharper (1680s) in this sense. Meaning "expert, connoisseur" is attested from 1840, and likely is from sharp (adj.). Music sense is from 1570s. The noun was used 14c. as "a sharp weapon, edge of a sword."
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-eyed 
in compounds, "having eyes" (of a specified kind), by c. 1300, from eye (n.).
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pop-eyed (adj.)

"having full, bulging, or prominent eyes," 1820; see pop (v.) + -eyed.

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blue-eyed (adj.)
"having blue eyes," c. 1600, from blue (adj.1) + -eyed. Meaning "favored; innocent" is by 1924.
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ox-eyed (adj.)

"having large, full eyes," 1620s, from ox + -eyed. An epithet used by Homer (boōpis) of the goddess Hera (Juno) and beautiful women. Oxeye has since c. 1400 been a name given to various flowering plants thought to resemble the eye of an ox; it is also used of certain birds, fishes, and a type of mirror.

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wall-eyed (adj.)
c. 1300, wawil-eghed, wolden-eiged, "having very light-colored eyes," also "having parti-colored eyes," from Old Norse vagl-eygr "having speckled eyes," from vagl "speck in the eye; beam, upper cross-beam, chicken-roots, perch," from Proto-Germanic *walgaz, from PIE *wogh-lo-, suffixed form of root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle." The prehistoric sense evolution would be from "weigh" to "lift," to "hold, support." Meaning "having one or both eyes turned out" (and thus showing much white) is first recorded 1580s.
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louche (adj.)
"dubious, disreputable," 1819, from French louche "squinting," from Old French lousche, lois (12c.) "cross-eyed, squint-eyed, lop-sided," from Latin lusca, fem. of luscus "blind in one eye, one-eyed," from Proto-Italic *luk-sko- "with partial sight, visually handicapped," from PIE *luk- "to see" or *leuk- "light" [de Vaan].
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Arimasp (n.)
1570s, from Latin Arimaspi (plural), from Greek Arimaspoi, mythical race of one-eyed people in Northern Europe believed in antiquity to have carried off a hoard of gold which was under guardianship of griffins. The name is said to be Scythian for "one-eyed." Related: Arimaspian.
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