Etymology
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gland (n.)

1690s, from French glande (Old French glandre "a gland," 13c.), from Latin glandula "gland of the throat, tonsil," diminutive of glans (genitive glandis) "acorn, nut; acorn-shaped ball," from PIE root *gwele- (2) "acorn" (source also of Greek balanos, Armenian kalin, Old Church Slavonic zelodi "acorn;" Lithuanian gilė "acorn"). Earlier English form was glandula (c. 1400); Middle English also had glandele "inflamed gland" (c. 1400). Extended from tonsils to glands generally.

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Cowper's gland (n.)

1738, so called because discovered by English anatomist William Cowper (1666-1709); for the surname see Cooper.

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same-sex (adj.)

by 1949, with reference to parents, "of the same sex as the child;" by 1981 as "involving partners of the same sex;" from same + sex (n.).

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lymphadenopathy (n.)

1899, from lymphadeno- "pertaining to a lymph gland" (from lymph + Greek adēnos, genitive of adēn "gland") + -pathy. Lymphadenoma is from 1870.

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adenoidal (adj.)

1852, "gland-like, resembling a gland," from adenoid + -al (1). From 1919 as "having the appearance of one with adenoids."

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thymus (n.)

gland near the base of the neck, 1690s, Modern Latin, from Greek thymos "a warty excrescence," used of the gland by Galen, literally "thyme," probably so called because of a fancied resemblance to a bud of thyme (see thyme). Related: Thymic.

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glandular (adj.)

1740, from French glandulaire, from glandule "small gland" (16c.), from Latin glandula (see gland). Earlier was glandelous (late 14c.), from Latin glandulosus.

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glanders (n.)

"horse disease characterized by glandular swelling," early 15c., from Old French glandres "swollen glands," plural of glandre "gland," from Latin glandula (see gland).

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