Etymology
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activity (n.)

c. 1400, "active or secular life," from Old French activité, from Medieval Latin activitatem (nominative activitas), a word in Scholastic philosophy, from Latin activus "active" (see active). The meaning "state of being active, briskness, liveliness" is recorded from 1520s; that of "capacity for acting on matter" is from 1540s. As "an educational exercise," by 1923.

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same-sex (adj.)

by 1949, with reference to parents, "of the same sex as the child;" by 1981 as "involving partners of the same sex;" from same + sex (n.).

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pansexual (adj.)

1926 (pansexualism is from 1917), from pan- + sexual. Originally in reference to the view that the sex instinct plays the primary part in all human activity, mental and physical; Freud's critics held this to be his view, and the word became a term of reproach leveled at early psychology. Meaning "not limited in sexual choice" is attested by 1972. Related: Pansexuality.

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unisexual (adj.)
1802, "of one sex, having only one sex," from uni- + sexual. Meaning "of or for a single sex" (of schools, etc.) is from 1885. Meaning "unisex" is from 1970. Related: Unisexual.
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sexless (adj.)

"having or as having no sex, asexual," 1590s, from sex (n.) + -less. Related: Sexlessly; sexlessness.

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sexpert (n.)

"sex therapist," 1924, from a jocular merger of sex (n.) + expert.

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sexology (n.)

"scientific study of sex and sexual relations," 1902, from sex (n.) + -ology. Related: Sexologist.

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oversexed (adj.)

also over-sexed, "inordinately desirous of sex; having sexual properties or tendencies in an excessive degree," 1898; see over- + sex (n.).

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