Etymology
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sequence (n.)

late 14c., in church music, a composition said or sung after the Alleluia and before the Gospel, from Old French sequence "answering verses" (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin sequentia "a following, a succession," from Latin sequentem (nominative sequens), present participle of sequi "to follow" (from PIE root *sekw- (1) "to follow").

In Church use, a partial loan-translation of Greek akolouthia, from akolouthos "following." By 1570s in the general sense of "a series of things following in a certain order, a succession," also in cards, "a run of three or more consecutive numbers of the same suit." By 1580s as "order of succession." In biochemistry in reference to nucleic acids, by 1959.

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sequence (v.)

"arrange in a sequence," 1954, in computing, from sequence (n.). In biochemistry by 1970. Related: Sequenced; sequencing.

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sequential (adj.)

"that follows as a sequence, being in succession," 1816, from Late Latin sequentia (see sequence) + -al (1). Related: Sequentially.

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*sekw- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to follow."

It forms all or part of: associate; association; consequence; consequent; dissociate; ensue; execute; extrinsic; intrinsic; obsequious; persecute; persecution; prosecute; pursue; second (adj.) "next after first;" second (n.) "one-sixtieth of a minute;" sect; secundine; segue; sequacious; sequel; sequence; sequester; sociable; social; society; socio-; subsequent; sue; suit; suite; suitor; tocsin.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sacate "accompanies, follows;" Avestan hacaiti, Greek hepesthai "to follow;" Latin sequi "to follow, come after," secundus "second, the following;" Lithuanian seku, sekti "to follow;" Old Irish sechim "I follow."

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seriation (n.)

"the forming of an orderly sequence," 1650s; see series + -ation. A verb seriate "arrange (things) in sequence" (1944) is probably a back-formation.

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digitalize (v.)
Origin and meaning of digitalize

"convert into a sequence of digits," 1962, from digital + -ize. Related: Digitalized; digitalizing.

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consecution (n.)

early 15c., "attainment;" 1530s, "proceeding in argument from one proposition to another in logical sequence," from Latin consecutionem (nominative consecutio), noun of action from past-participle stem of consequi "to follow after," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sequi "to follow" (from PIE root *sekw- (1) "to follow"). Meaning "any succession or sequence" is from 1650s.

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disarray (n.)

late 14c., "disorder, confusion, condition of being out of regular order," from dis- "opposite of" + array (n.) "order, arrangement, sequence," or perhaps from Old French desarroi.

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run-up (n.)

1834, "an act of running upward," from verbal phrase (late 14c.), from run (v.) + up (adv.). Extended sense "period of time or sequence of events proceeding some important event" is from 1966.

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Stabat Mater 
Latin Stabat Mater dolorosa "Stood the Mother (of Jesus) full of sorrow," opening words of a sequence composed 13c. by Jacobus de Benedictis.
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