Etymology
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sensory (adj.)

"of or pertaining to sense or sensation, conveying sensation," 1749, from Latin sensorius, from sensus, past participle of sentire "to perceive, feel" (see sense (n.)).

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system (n.)

1610s, "the whole creation, the universe," from Late Latin systema "an arrangement, system," from Greek systema "organized whole, a whole compounded of parts," from stem of synistanai "to place together, organize, form in order," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + root of histanai "cause to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

Meaning "set of correlated principles, facts, ideas, etc." first recorded 1630s. Meaning "animal body as an organized whole, sum of the vital processes in an organism" is recorded from 1680s; hence figurative phrase to get (something) out of one's system (1900). Computer sense of "group of related programs" is recorded from 1963. All systems go (1962) is from U.S. space program. The system "prevailing social order" is from 1806.

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Dewey Decimal system (n.)

library classification system that organizes information into 10 broad areas subdivided numerically into progressively smaller topics, by 1885, named for Melvil Dewey (1851-1931) who proposed it 1876 while acting librarian of Amherst College. He also crusaded for simplified spelling and the metric system.

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extrasensory (adj.)

also extra-sensory, "beyond or not involving the usual senses," 1934, coined as part of extra-sensory perception in J.B. Rhine's work, from extra- + sensory. Extrasensible (1874) was used earlier in reference to "that which is inaccessible to the senses."

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ESP (n.)

also e.s.p., 1934, initialism (acronym) for extra-sensory perception.

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sensorimotor (adj.)

"pertaining to sensation and to motion," 1855, from combining form of sensory + motor (n.).

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feeling (adj.)

c. 1400, "pertaining to the physical senses, sensory," present-participle adjective from feel (v.). Related: Feelingly.

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proprioceptor (n.)

"sensory structure which receives stimuli arising within the tissues," 1906, from Latin proprius "own" (see proper) + reception. Coined by English neurophysiologist C.S. Sherrington (1857-1952). Related: Proprioceptive; proprioception.

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sensor (n.)

"device giving a signal about some physical activity," 1947, from a shortened form of sensory (q.v.) or an agent noun in Latin form from sense (v.).

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