Etymology
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semen (n.)

"thick, whitish fluid containing spermatozoa as its essential ingredient," late 14c., from Latin semen "seed of plants, animals, or men; race, inborn characteristic; posterity, progeny, offspring," figuratively "origin, essence, principle, cause" (from PIE *semen- "seed," suffixed form of root *sē- "to sow").

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sow (v.)

Old English sawan "to scatter seed upon the ground or plant it in the earth, disseminate" (class VII strong verb; past tense seow, past participle sawen), from Proto-Germanic *sean (source also of Old Norse sa, Old Saxon saian, Middle Dutch sayen, Dutch zaaien, Old High German sawen, German säen, Gothic saian), from PIE root *sē- "to sow," source of semen, season (n.), seed (n.). Figurative sense was in Old English.

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*sē- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to sow." 

It forms all or part of: disseminate; inseminate; seed; seme (adj.); semen; seminal; seminar; seminary; semination; sinsemilla; sow (v.); season.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin serere "to sow;" Old Church Slavonic sejo, sejati; Lithuanian sju, sti "to sow;" Old English sawan "to sow;" Old Prussian semen "seed," Lithuanian smenys "seed of flax," Old Church Slavonic seme, Old High German samo, German Same;Old English sed, sd "that which may be sown; an individual grain of seed." 

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insemination (n.)

1650s, "action of sowing," noun of action from inseminate. Meaning "infusion of semen" is from 1854.

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seminal (adj.)

late 14c., "of or pertaining to seed or semen, of the elements of reproduction," from Old French seminal (14c.) and directly from Latin seminalis "of or belonging to seed; good for seed," from semen (genitive seminis) "seed" (from PIE root *sē- "to sow"). Figurative sense ("having the properties of a seed") is attested by 1630s, "rudimentary, primary; full of possibilities." Related: Seminally; seminality.

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vas (n.)

in anatomy, "a tube, duct, or conduit for conveying blood, lymph, semen, etc.," plural vasa, Latin, literally "vessel." Vas deferens (plural vasa defferentia) is from 1570s.

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sinsemilla (n.)

potent strain of marijuana, 1975, from Mexican Spanish, literally "without seed," ultimately from Latin sine "without" (see sans) + semen "seed" (from PIE root *sē- "to sow").

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semee (adj.)

"covered with a small, constantly repeating pattern," 1560s, from French semée "strewn, sprinkled," past participle of semer, from Latin seminare "to sow," from semen (genitive seminis) "seed" (from PIE root *sē- "to sow").

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ejaculate (v.)

1570s, "emit semen," from Latin eiaculatus, past participle of eiaculari "to throw out, shoot out," from ex "out" (see ex-) + iaculari "to throw, hurl, cast, dart," from iaculum "javelin, dart," from iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Sense of "exclaim suddenly" is from 1660s. Related: Ejaculated; ejaculating; ejaculatory.

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gonorrhea (n.)

also gonorrhoea, 1520s, from Late Latin gonorrhoia, from Greek gonos "seed" (see gonad) + rhoe "flow," from rhein "to flow" (from PIE root *sreu- "to flow"). Mucus discharge was mistaken for semen. In early records often Gomoria, etc., from folk etymology association with biblical Gomorrah. Related: Gonorrheal; gonorrhoeal.

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