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see (v.)

Old English seon "to see, look, behold; observe, perceive, understand; experience, visit, inspect" (contracted class V strong verb; past tense seah, past participle sewen), from Proto-Germanic *sehwanan (source also of Old Saxon, Old High German sehan, Middle High German, German sehen, Old Frisian sia, Middle Dutch sien, Old Norse sja, Gothic saihwan), from PIE root *sekw- (2) "to see," which is probably identical with *sekw- (1) "to follow" (see sequel), a root which produced words for "say" in Greek and Latin, and also words for "follow" (such as Latin sequor), but "opinions differ in regard to the semantic starting-point and sequences" [Buck]. Thus see might originally mean "follow with the eyes."

Used in Middle English to mean "behold in the imagination or in a dream" (c. 1200), "to recognize the force of (a demonstration)," also c. 1200. Sense of "escort" (as in to see (someone) home) first recorded 1607 in Shakespeare. Meaning "to receive as a visitor" is attested from c. 1500. Gambling sense of "equal a bet" is from 1590s. See you as a casual farewell first attested 1891. Let me see as a pausing statement is recorded from 1510s.

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see (n.)
c. 1300, "throne of a bishop, archbishop, or pope," also "throne of a monarch, a goddess, Antichrist, etc.," from Old French sie "seat, throne; town, capital; episcopal see," from Latin sedem (nominative sedes) "seat, throne, abode, temple," related to sedere "to sit," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." Early 14c. as "administrative center of a bishopric;" c. 1400 as "province under the jurisdiction of a bishop."
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see-through (adj.)
1950, from the verbal phrase (c. 1400); see see (v.) + through (adv.).
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look-see (n.)
"inspection," 1865, "Pidgin-like formation" [OED], first used in representations of English as spoken by Chinese, from look (v.) + see (v.).
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see-saw (n.)

also seesaw, 1630s, in see-saw-sacke a downe (like a Sawyer), words in a rhythmic jingle used by children and repetitive motion workers, probably imitative of the rhythmic back-and-forth motion of sawyers working a two-man saw over wood or stone (see saw (n.1). Ha ha.).

In reference to a game of going up and down on a balanced plank, it is recorded from 1704; figurative sense is from 1714. Applied from 1824 to the plank arranged for the game. Also compare teeter-totter under teeter (v.). 

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see-saw (v.)
also seesaw, "move up and down," 1712, from see-saw (n.). Related: See-sawed; see-sawing.
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saw (v.)
past tense of see; from Old English plural sawon.
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seeing (adj.)
c. 1300, present-participle adjective from see (v.). Seeing Eye dog first attested 1929, American English, trademarked by Seeing Eye Inc. of New Jersey.
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sightseeing (n.)
also sight-seeing, 1821, from sight (see sights) + present participle of see (v.). Sight-see (v.) is from 1824. Sight-seer first recorded 1821.
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seer (n.)
late 14c., "one to whom divine revelations are made," agent noun from see (v.). Originally rendering Latin videns, Greek bleptor (from Hebrew roeh) in Bible translations (such as I Kings ix.9). Literal sense of "one who sees" is attested from early 15c.
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