Etymology
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seasoning (n.)

1510s, "act or time of impregnation" (a sense now obsolete); c. 1600, "act of adding flavor;" 1570s, "something added to food to impart flavor," also figurative; verbal noun from season (v.). Of enslaved persons, "become inured to the conditions of slavery," by 1771.

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tempura (n.)
1920, from Japanese, probably from Portuguese tempero "seasoning."
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aromatic (adj.)
c. 1400, aromatyk, "giving out an aroma, fragrant, sweet," from Latin aromaticus, from Greek aromatikos, from aroma (genitive aromatos) "seasoning, sweet spice," which is of unknown origin.
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pot-pie (n.)

also potpie, "pie made by lining the inner surface of a pot with pastry and filling it with meat and seasoning and baking it," 1807, American English, from pot (n.1) + pie (n.).

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unseasoned (adj.)
1580s, "not made palatable by seasoning," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of season (v.). Meaning "not habituated by experience" is recorded from c. 1600.
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aromatize (v.)
"to perfume, render aromatic" (of medicines, the breath), early 15c., from Latin aromatizare, from Greek aromatizein "to spice," from aromat-, stem of aroma "seasoning, sweet spice," which is of unknown origin.
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condiment (n.)

mid-15c., "a pickling fluid, seasoning, sauce, something used to give relish to food," from Old French condiment (13c.), from Latin condimentum "spice, seasoning, sauce," from condire "to preserve, pickle, season, put fruit in vinegar, wine, spices, etc.," a variant of condere "put together, store," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + -dere "put," from PIE root *dhe- "to put, place."

Related: Condimental. Middle English also had a verb condite (early 15c.) "to season, prepare or preserve with salt, spices, sugar, etc."

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aroma (n.)
early 13c., "fragrant substance, spice" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin aroma "sweet odor," from Greek aroma "seasoning, a spice or sweet herb," which is of unknown origin. Meaning "fragrance, odor," especially an agreeable one, is from 1814. A hypercorrect plural is aromata. Related: Aromal.
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savor (n.)

c. 1200, savour, "agreeable flavor; agreeable smell; pleasure, delight," from Old French savor "flavor, taste; sauce, seasoning; delight, pleasure," from Latin saporem (nominative sapor) "taste, flavor," related to sapere "to have a flavor" (see sapient). By c. 1300 as the flavor of a thing in any sense. From late 14c. as "taste as a property of matter."

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aspic (n.)
type of savory meat jelly, 1789, from French aspic "jelly" (18c.), apparently from Old French aspe "asp" (see asp). The foodstuff said to be so called from its coldness (froid comme un aspic is said by Littré to be a proverbial phrase), or the colors in the gelatin, or the shape of the mold. It also was a French word for "lavender spike" and might refer to lavender as a seasoning element in the jelly.
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