Etymology
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sculpt (v.)

"to cut, carve, engrave," 1826 (implied in sculpted), from French sculpter, from Latin sculpt-, past-participle stem of sculpere "to carve" (see sculpture). Related: Sculpting. The older verb form was sculpture (1640s), from the noun, also sculp (1530s), from Latin sculpere. Related: Sculptured.

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imagine (v.)

mid-14c., "to form a mental image of," from Old French imaginer "sculpt, carve, paint; decorate, embellish" (13c.), from Latin imaginari "to form a mental picture, picture to oneself, imagine" (also, in Late Latin imaginare "to form an image of, represent"), from imago "an image, a likeness," from stem of imitari "to copy, imitate" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy"). Sense of "suppose, assume" is first recorded late 14c. Related: Imagined; imagining.

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sculptor (n.)

1630s, "one who models in clay or wax, casts or strikes in bronze or other metal, or carves figures in stone," from Latin sculptor "one who cuts or carves," agent noun from sculpt-, past-participle stem of sculpere "to carve" (see sculpture). Formerly of broader application than in modern use. Fem. form sculptress is attested from 1660s.

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