Etymology
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scuff (v.)

1768, "to walk (through or over something) without raising the feet," originally Scottish, a word "Of uncertain and possibly mixed origin" [OED], probably from a Scandinavian source related to Old Norse skufa, skyfa "to shove, push aside" (from Proto-Germanic *skubanan, from PIE *skeubh- "to shove;" see shove (v.)).

The meaning "injure the surface of by hard usage or grazing with something rough" is by 1879. Related: Scuffed; scuffing. As a noun, "a slight, glancing blow," by 1824. Compare cuff (v.2).

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scuffy (adj.)

"lacking or having lost the original finish and freshness," hence "shabby-looking," 1858; see scuff (v.) + -y (2). Past-participle adjective scuffed in the sense of "worn, shabby" is by 1819. Related: Scuffiness.

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scuffle (v.)

"to push or fight in a disorderly manner, struggle confusedly at close quarters," 1570s (transitive), 1580s (intransitive), probably a frequentative form of scuff (v.), but OED is against this; perhaps ultimately of Scandinavian origin. Related: Scuffled; scuffling. As a noun, "a confused pushing or struggle," c. 1600, from the verb.

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