Etymology
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screen (n.)
mid-14c., "upright piece of furniture providing protection from heat of a fire, drafts, etc.," probably from a shortened (Anglo-French? compare Anglo-Latin screna) variant of Old North French escren, Old French escran "fire-screen" (early 14c.), perhaps from Middle Dutch scherm "screen, cover, shield," or Frankish *skrank "barrier," from Proto-Germanic *skerm- (source also of Old High German skirm, skerm "protection," from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut."

Meaning "net-wire frame used in windows and doors" is recorded from 1859. Meaning "flat vertical surface for reception of projected images" is from 1810, originally in reference to magic lantern shows; later of movies. Transferred sense of "cinema world collectively" is attested from 1914; hence screen test (1918), etc. Screen saver first attested 1990. Screen printing recorded from 1918.
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screen (v.)
"to shield from punishment, to conceal," late 15c., from screen (n.). Meaning "examine systematically for suitability" is from 1943; sense of "to release a movie" is from 1915. Related: Screened; screening.
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split-screen (adj.)
1949, from noun use (1946); see split (adj.) + screen (n.).
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smoke-screen (n.)
1915, as a form of military camouflage, from smoke (n.1) + screen (n.); 1926 in the figurative sense. The association of smoke with "deception, deliberate obscurity" dates back to at least 1560s.
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screenshot (n.)
by 1991, from (computer) screen (n.) + shot (n.) in the photograph sense.
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screenwriter (n.)
1921, from screen (n.) in the film sense + writer.
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screenplay (n.)
1916, from screen (n.) in the cinematic sense + play (n.).
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prescreen (v.)

also pre-screen, 1952, of movies, "to screen beforehand," from pre- "before" + screen (v.). Related: Prescreened; prescreening.

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sunscreen (n.)
1738 as an object to block the sun's rays, from sun (n.) + screen (n.). As a type of lotion applied to the skin, by 1954.
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